Klaus Augenthaler

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Klaus Augenthaler
Klaus-Augenthaler.jpg
Klaus Augenthaler 2011
Personal information
Full name Klaus Augenthaler
Date of birth (1957-09-26) 26 September 1957 (age 56)
Place of birth Fürstenzell, West Germany
Height 1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position Sweeper/Defender
Youth career
1964–1975 FC Vilshofen
1975–1976 Bayern Munich
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1976–1991 Bayern Munich[1] 404 (52)
Total 404 (52)
National team
1975–1976 West Germany Youth 11 (3)
1979–1981 West Germany B 8 (1)
1983–1990 West Germany 27 (0)
Teams managed
1991–1992 Bayern Munich (youth team)
1992–1997 Bayern Munich (assistant)
1996 Bayern Munich (caretaker)
1997–2000 Grazer AK
2000–2003 1. FC Nürnberg
2003–2005 Bayer Leverkusen
2005–2007 VfL Wolfsburg
2010–2011 SpVgg Unterhaching
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Klaus "Auge" Augenthaler (born 26 September 1957 in Fürstenzell, near Passau in Bavaria, Germany)[2] is a former German football player and now manager. In his 15 year club career with FC Bayern Munich, he won seven Bundesliga titles. He also represented the West Germany national team, winning the FIFA World Cup in 1990.

In 2005, he was named as a member of the greatest Bayern Munich XI in the club's history.[3]

Playing years[edit]

Augenthaler played generally in the position of central defender or, especially in the later part of his career, libero. In his years with Bayern Munich he won the Bundesliga title seven times and the DFB-Pokal three times. In the European Cup he was runner-up in 1982, vs. Aston Villa (0–1), but missed the final 1987 through suspension, when Bayern lost 2–1 to FC Porto.

From 1984 until the end of his career as player in 1991 Klaus Augenthaler also captained his club side. He played 404 Bundesliga matches[4] and made 89 appearances in European cup competitions[5] for Bayern.

Between 1983 and 1990 he played 27 times for the German National Football Team, with which he won the World Cup 1990 in Italy in the final against Argentina (1–0). He was also part of the squad that reached the final of the 1986 World Cup, but there he only participated in two group matches.

Managerial career[edit]

His managerial career started as assistant coach with Bayern Munich, serving under coaches Søren Lerby, Erich Ribbeck, Franz Beckenbauer, Giovanni Trapattoni and Otto Rehhagel. He managed the last match of the 1995–96 season against Fortuna Düsseldorf.[6] From there he moved to become head coach of Austrian side Grazer AK from 1997 to 2000,[7] taking them to two excellent third placings.

In the winter break of 1999–2000 he left Graz and took over 1. FC Nürnberg on 2 March 2000,[8] then in the second division, leading them to promotion.

On 29 April 2003, Nürnberg sacked Augenthaler,[9] as the club was facing relegation. He took over the reins at Bayer 04 Leverkusen in May 2003.[10] He managed to save the club from relegation and stayed on there until September 2005.[11]

In December of that same year he was hired by VfL Wolfsburg.[12] His undistinguished time there ended shortly before the end of the season 2006–07.[13] On 23 March 2010, he signed a half-year contract with SpVgg Unterhaching and replaced Matthias Lust.[14] His contract was terminated on 3 June 2011.[15]

Coaching record[edit]

As of 18 January 2014
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Bayern Munich 18 May 1996[6] 30 June 1996 1 0 1 0 00.00 [6]
Grazer AK 1 July 1997[7] 1 March 2000[7] 111 55 19 37 49.55 [16][17]
[18]
1. FC Nürnberg 2 March 2000[8] 29 April 2003[9] 119 49 20 50 41.18 [19]
Bayer Leverkusen 13 May 2003[10] 16 September 2005[11] 94 46 21 27 48.94 [20]
VfL Wolfsburg 28 December 2005[12] 19 May 2007[13] 56 15 20 21 26.79 [21]
SpVgg Unterhaching 23 March 2010[14] 3 June 2011[15] 49 16 16 17 32.65 [22]
Total 430 181 97 152 42.09

Honours[edit]

As player:

Bayern Munich
International

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Klaus "Auge" Augenthaler" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 6 March 2010. 
  2. ^ Schulze-Marmeling, Dietrich (2003). Die Bayern. Die Geschichte des deutschen Rekordmeisters. Die Werkstatt. p. 637. ISBN 3-89533-426-X. 
  3. ^ "Fans name greatest reds of all time". FC Bayern München. 1 June 2005. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Matthias Arnhold (15 May 2014). "Klaus Augenthaler - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Marcel Haisma (14 March 2004). "Klaus Augenthaler - Matches in European Cups". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c "Bayern München - Fortuna Düsseldorf". 19 May 1996. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c "Klaus Augenthaler" (in German). Fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Augenthaler neuer Trainer in Nürnberg". kicker (in German). 2 March 2000. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "Wolfgang Wolf übernimmt beim FCN". kicker (in German). 29 April 2003. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
  10. ^ a b "Augenthaler übernimmt Bayer". kicker (in German). 13 May 2003. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Bayer feuert Klaus Augenthaler". kicker (in German). 16 September 2005. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Augenthaler: Vertrag bis 2007". kicker (in German). 28 December 2005. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "Aus für "Auge" und Frontzeck". kicker (in German). 19 May 2007. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  14. ^ a b ""Auge" soll die Klasse halten". kicker (in German). 23 March 2010. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Höchste Alarmstufe – Augenthaler und Grosser weg" (in German). kicker.de. 3 June 2011. Retrieved 1 July 2011. 
  16. ^ "Grazer AC » Dates & results 1997/1998". World Football. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "Grazer AC » Dates & results 1998/1999". World Football. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  18. ^ "Grazer AC » Dates & results 1999/2000". World Football. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  19. ^ "1. FC Nürnberg" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  20. ^ "Bayer 04 Leverkusen" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  21. ^ "VfL Wolfsburg" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  22. ^ "Klaus Augenthaler" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 

External links[edit]