Klopsteg Memorial Award

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The Klopsteg Memorial Award is given to a notable physicist in memory of Paul E. Klopsteg. Established in 1990, it is awarded by the American Association of Physics Teachers.

The Klopsteg Memorial Award recipient is asked to make a major presentation at an AAPT Summer Meeting on a topic of current significance suitable for non-specialists.


Award Winners[edit]

Year Awardee Institution Topic
2011 James E. Hansen NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Halting Human-Made Climate Change: The Case for Young People and Nature
2010 Robert Scherrer Vanderbilt University Science and Science Fiction
2009 Lee Smolin Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics The Role of the Scientist as a Public Intellectual
2008 Michio Kaku City University of New York Physics of the Impossible
2007 Neil deGrasse Tyson Astrophysicist and Director, Hayden Planetarium, American Museum of Natural History, New York Adventures in Science Illiteracy
2006 Lisa Randall Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions
2005 Wendy Freedman Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA The Accelerating Universe
2004 Anton Zeilinger University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Quantum Experiments: From Philosophical Curiosity to a New Technology
2003 Sylvester James Gates University of Maryland, College Park, MD Why Einstein Would Love Spaghetti in Fundamental Physics
2002 Barry C. Barish California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA Catching the Waves with LIGO
2001 Virginia Trimble University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA Cosmology: Man's Place in the Universe
2000 Terrence P. Walker The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH The Big Bang: Seeing Back to the Beginning
1999 Michael S. Turner University of Chicago Cosmology: From Quantum Fluctuations to the Expanding Universe
1998 Sidney R. Nagel The James Franck Institute Physics at the Breakfast Table - Or Waking Up to Physics
1997 Max Dresden Stanford University and Stanford Linear Accelerator Scales, Macroscopic, Microscopic, Mesoscopic: Their Autonomy and Interrelation
1996 Margaret Geller Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Optical Infrared Astronomy Division
1995 Peter Franken University of Arizona Municipal Waste, Recycling, and Nuclear Garbage
1994 N. David Mermin Cornell University More Quantum Magic
1993 Charles P. Bean Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York An Invitation to Table-Top Physics Inside and in the Open Air
1992 Gabriel Wienreich University of Michigan at Anne Arbor What Science Knows about Violins And What It Doesn't Know, Am. J. Phys. 61, 1067 (1993).
1991 Paul K. Hansman University of California at Santa Barbara Seeing Atoms with the New Generation of Microscopes, Am. J. Phys. 59, 1067 (1991).

References[edit]