Knot (hieroglyph)

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S24
Knot
in hieroglyphs
Statue of Raherka, 2350BC, 4th/5th Dynasty.

The ancient Egyptian knot hieroglyph, or girdle knot, Gardiner sign listed no. S24, portrays a reef knot. Besides its use as a hieroglyph, it has usage in statuary and reliefs; it is also an amulet, typically made of worked stone, or as jewellery elements.[1]

Language usage[edit]

The knot hieroglyph is used in the Egyptian language as the verb, (th)s, (th)ss, for to knot, to tie, to tie together, etc.

V13
S24
O34
 
V13
O34
O34
S24

It is used as the phonogram for (th)s, as well as the determinative. There are many alternate spellings. For the noun, it is Egyptian language (th)s, (th)s.t,

S24
X1 Z1
 
S24
Z1
 
S24
O34
Z7
D40
 
S24
O34
G43 F41

for meanings of: knot, tie, ligature, backbone, vertebrae, spine, etc.

In jewellery and decoration[edit]

The knot used as an article of jewellery was especially known in the Middle Kingdom. It can be found in necklaces (see gallery photo), and as a small brooch. In Amulets of Ancient Egypt, a two-part, hollow gold piece is shown, with a detailed rope-detailed fiber; it is made with a tongue and groove closure for the parts.[2]

Preceded by
S15

to glitter
-- --
(th)hn
S24

knot
-- --
(th)s
Succeeded by
U40

to lift up
-- --
(th)sy

Gallery[edit]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andrews, 1994. Amulets of Ancient Egypt.
  2. ^ Andrews, 1994. p. 44, plate 49b.
  • Andrews, Carol, 1994. Amulets of Ancient Egypt, chapter 4: Scarabs for the living and funerary scarabs, pp 50–59, Andrews, Carol, c 1993, University of Texas Press, 518 amulets, 1, or multiples included in 12 necklaces; (softcover, ISBN 0-292-70464-X)
  • Budge. An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, E.A.Wallace Budge, (Dover Publications), c 1978, (c 1920), Dover edition, 1978. (In two volumes, 1314 pp, and cliv-(154) pp.) (softcover, ISBN 0-486-23615-3)