Knowledge Graph

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The Knowledge Graph is a knowledge base used by Google to enhance its search engine's search results with semantic-search information gathered from a wide variety of sources. Knowledge Graph display was added to Google's search engine in 2012, starting in the United States, having been announced on May 16, 2012.[1] It provides structured and detailed information about the topic in addition to a list of links to other sites. The goal is that users would be able to use this information to resolve their query without having to navigate to other sites and assemble the information themselves.[2]

History[edit]

According to Google, the information in the Knowledge Graph is derived from many sources, including the CIA World Factbook, Freebase, and Wikipedia.[1] The feature is similar in intent to answer engines such as Ask Jeeves and Wolfram Alpha.

As of 2012, its semantic network contained over 570 million objects and more than 18 billion facts about and relationships between different objects that are used to understand the meaning of the keywords entered for the search.[3]

Microsoft Bing's digital assistant, named Satori Knowledge Base, was revealed to the public in mid-2013, but further details were not released. Senior director for Bing Stefan Weitz explained:

We have had internal debates about when to ship something. We could come out with something now like them, but it wouldn't be state of the art. It's too constrained to be an agent now. We are not shipping until we have something more revolutionary than evolutionary.[4]

On December 4, 2012, the feature was introduced in seven more languages: Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, and Italian.[5][6]

According to some news websites, the implementation of Google's Knowledge Graph has played a role in the page view decline of various language versions of Wikipedia, an Internet encyclopedia.[7][8][9][10]

Conversational search[edit]

During the Google I/O conference in May 2013, Google's Amit Singhal presented[11] on the future of search, explaining that a search engine's three primary functions will need to evolve and that search will need to: 1. Answer, 2. Converse, and 3. Anticipate. As part of his keynote talk, Singhal stated, "A computer you can talk to? And it will answer everything you ask it? Little did I know, I would grow up to become the person responsible for building my dream for the entire world." Conversational search technology was then featured and Singhal introduced the term "hot-wording" to describe search without the need for an interface, whereby the user simply prompts the Google search engine by stating, "OK Google."[12]

The I/O audience was then shown a demonstration in which a user asked a question about Santa Cruz and the search engine answered back in "conversation," in addition to the presentation of results for the query. Google's Johanna Wright explained that the search engine uses data from the Knowledge Graph to produce results: "The Knowledge Graph knows that Santa Cruz is a place, and that this list of places are related to Santa Cruz".[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Singhal, Amit (May 16, 2012). "Introducing the Knowledge Graph: Things, Not Strings". Official Blog (of Google). Retrieved May 18, 2012. 
  2. ^ (registration required) Waters, Richard (May 16, 2012). "Google To Unveil Search Results Overhaul". Financial Times. Retrieved May 16, 2012. 
  3. ^ Staff (December 4, 2012). "Get smarter answers from the Knowledge Graph from Português to 日本語 to русский". Google. Retrieved December 4, 2012. 
  4. ^ Dan Farber (30 July 2013). "Microsoft's Bing seeks enlightenment with Satori". Cnet. CBS Interactive Inc. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  5. ^ Newton, Casey (December 14, 2012). "How Google is taking the Knowledge Graph global". CNET. 
  6. ^ Brown, Aaron (December 12, 2012). "Get smarter answers from the Knowledge Graph from Português to 日本語 to русский". Inside Search (Google). 
  7. ^ Orlowski, Andrew (13 January 2014). "Google stabs Wikipedia in the front". The Register. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
  8. ^ Kohs, Gregory (6 January 2014). "Google’s Knowledge Graph Boxes: killing Wikipedia?". Wikipediocracy. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
  9. ^ Marshall, Gary. "Like Harvey Dent, Google has become Two Face". TechRadar. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
  10. ^ Andrieu, Olivier (14 January 2014). "Le Knowledge Graph de Google ferait baisser le trafic de Wikipedia" (in French). Abondance. Retrieved 15 January 2014. 
  11. ^ Google (May 15, 2013). "Google I/O 2013: Keynote". 
  12. ^ a b Jessica Lee (16 May 2013). "OK Google: 'The End of Search as We Know It'". Search Engine Watch. Incisive Interactive Marketing LLC. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 

External links[edit]