Knox County, Texas

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Knox County, Texas
Benjamin03 courthouse 01.jpg
The Knox County Courthouse in Benjamin, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Knox County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1876
Named for Henry Knox
Seat Benjamin
Largest city Munday
Area
 • Total 855 sq mi (2,214 km2)
 • Land 851 sq mi (2,204 km2)
 • Water 5 sq mi (13 km2), 0.75%
Population
 • (2010) 3,719
 • Density 5/sq mi (2/km²)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.knoxcountytexas.org

Knox County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,719.[1] Its county seat is Benjamin.[2] The county is named for Henry Knox, an American Revolutionary War general.

The 1932 Texas Republican gubernatorial nominee, Orville Bullington, resided in Knox County and served as county attorney early in his career.

Knox County is represented in the Texas House of Representatives by the Republican James Frank, a businessman from Wichita Falls.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 855 square miles (2,210 km2), of which 851 square miles (2,200 km2) is land and 5 square miles (13 km2) (0.6%) is water.[3]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Notable geographic features[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 77
1890 1,134 1,372.7%
1900 2,322 104.8%
1910 9,625 314.5%
1920 9,240 −4.0%
1930 11,368 23.0%
1940 10,090 −11.2%
1950 10,082 −0.1%
1960 7,857 −22.1%
1970 5,972 −24.0%
1980 5,329 −10.8%
1990 4,837 −9.2%
2000 4,253 −12.1%
2010 3,719 −12.6%
Est. 2012 3,789 1.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1850-2010[5]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 4,253 people, 1,690 households, and 1,166 families residing in the county. The population density was 5 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 2,129 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.35% White, 6.91% Black or African American, 1.08% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 14.77% from other races, and 2.56% from two or more races. 25.09% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,690 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.00% were married couples living together, 9.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.00% were non-families. 29.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.70% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 22.90% from 25 to 44, 21.00% from 45 to 64, and 22.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,453, and the median income for a family was $30,602. Males had a median income of $25,571 versus $20,865 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,443. About 17.10% of families and 22.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.20% of those under age 18 and 15.20% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The following school districts serve Knox County:

Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp[edit]

The city of Goree in Knox County is the site of the annual Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp, an event for aspiring Western Swing musicians of all ages to showcase their musical talents. The camp's namesake was a fiddle player who was originally from Goree. The camp was profiled in a story that aired on July 21, 2010 on National Public Radio's Morning Edition program.[7]

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ Texas Almanac: County Population History 1850-2010 Retrieved December 18, 2013
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  7. ^ Highlights, transcript, and audio links to NPR story on the Bobby Boatright Memorial Music Camp that aired 07/21/10

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°37′N 99°44′W / 33.61°N 99.74°W / 33.61; -99.74