Knox County Schools

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Knox County Schools is the school district that operates all public schools in Knox County, Tennessee.

History[edit]

Before the 1987-1988 school year, the city of Knoxville and Knox County operated separate school districts. In that year the two systems were consolidated into Knox County Schools.[1]

Statistics[edit]

The district has 88 schools (including 50 elementary schools, 14 middle schools, 14 high schools, 11 special schools) with 8,339 employees serving approximately 57,800 students in the cities of Knoxville and Farragut as well as all other communities in the county. There are 3,927 classroom teachers, 85 principals, and 126 assistant principals. The system has another 549 certified personnel plus 3,652 support staff. All middle and high schools are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and 96% of the elementary schools are accredited.

As of April 2012, there were 1,431 students enrolled in Pre-K, 27,168 K-5, 12,879 grades 6-8, 16,230 grades 9-12, and 104 in non-traditional schools. Of the student population, 76.6% are white, 5.3% Hispanic, 2.2% Asian/Pacific Island, and 13.9% African-American.[2]

Schools[edit]

The district has a total of 88 schools.

Elementary schools[edit]

Knox County operates 50 elementary schools.

  • A. L. Lotts
  • Adrian Burnett
  • Amherst
  • Ball Camp
  • Bearden
  • Beaumont Magnet Elementary and Honors/Fine Arts Academy
  • Belle Morris
  • Blue Grass
  • Bonny Kate
  • Brickey-McCloud
  • Carter
  • Cedar Bluff
  • Chilhowee Intermediate
  • Christenberry
  • Copper Ridge
  • Corryton
  • Dogwood
  • East Knox County
  • Farragut Intermediate
  • Farragut Primary
  • Fountain City
  • Gap Creek
  • Gibbs
  • Green Magnet Math and Science Academy
  • Halls
  • Hardin Valley
  • Inskip
  • Karns
  • Lonsdale
  • Maynard
  • Mooreland Heights
  • Mount Olive
  • New Hopewell
  • Northshore
  • Norwood
  • Pleasant Ridge
  • Pond Gap
  • Powell
  • Ritta
  • Rocky Hill
  • Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Technology Academy
  • Sequoyah
  • Shannondale
  • South Knoxville
  • Spring Hill
  • Sterchi
  • Sunnyview
  • West Haven
  • West Hills
  • West View

Middle schools[edit]

The district operates 14 middle schools, enrolling grades 6-8.

  • Bearden Middle
  • Carter Middle
  • Cedar Bluff Middle
  • Farragut Middle
  • Gresham Middle
  • Halls Middle
  • Holston Middle
  • Karns Middle
  • Northwest Middle
  • Powell Middle
  • South-Doyle Middle
  • Vine Middle
  • West Valley Middle
  • Whittle Springs Middle

High schools[edit]

The district operates 14 high schools. These are:

Special schools[edit]

There are 10 Knox County schools offering special or non-traditional programs. Included are three vocational high school programs:

  • Byington-Solway Career and Technical Education Center, located at Karns High School
  • Lincoln Park Technology and Trade Center
  • North Knox Career and Technical Education Center, located at Halls High School

The Knox County Adult High School offers day and evening high school classes for adult students (age 18 and older) desiring to complete a regular high school diploma. It is housed in the historic Knoxville High School building.

Knox County public preschools are:

  • Fair Garden Preschool
  • Sam E. Hill Family Community Center

Other special schools are:

  • Fort Sanders Educational Development Center, offering special education services, primarily for children of preschool age
  • The Knoxville Adaptive Education Center, a special school for students with mental health needs, including three elementary, three middle, and seven high school classrooms at the school, plus similar "satellite" classrooms in other county schools
  • Richard Yoakley Alternative School
  • Ridgedale Alternative School

Governance and strategic planning[edit]

Knox County Schools is governed by a nine-member elected board of education[3] and directed by an appointed superintendent.

Superintendent Dr. James P. McIntyre's vision emphasizes "Building on Strength: Excellence for All Children"[4] for Knox County Schools. The Board of Education has adopted a strategic plan to implement the vision. The strategic plan has four main goals with time frames and evaluations across five years.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ed Young and Harry Green, School System Consolidation, TACIR Staff Education Brief 8, Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, November 2005
  2. ^ "Knox County Schools: Facts and Figures", Knox County Schools website, retrieved 2013-05-01 
  3. ^ Board of Education, Knox County Schools website
  4. ^ Building on Strength: Excellence for All Children, Knox County Schools, December 3, 2008
  5. ^ DETAILS OF PLAN, Knox County Schools website

External links[edit]