Knut Hjeltnes (athlete)

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Knut Hjeltnes
Coach Knut Hjeltnes

Knut Hjeltnes (born December 8, 1952) is a college coach and former athlete from Norway.

Hjeltnes, who was born in Øystese, has won 20 National Championships; 11 in Discus throw, in 1975-1976, 1978, 1980-1981, 1982-84 1986, and 1988–89 and 9 in Shot Put, in 1975-1978, and 1980-1984.

He was ranked 2nd through 7th in the World in the Discus for twelve years from 1976-1988.[1]

He was a 4-Time Olympian in Track & Field (76, 80-boycott, 84 & 88). His best Olympic placings were two 7th places in 1976 and 1988, and a 4th place in 1984. His best World Championship placing is 9th in 1983. His best European Championship placing is 4th in 1986. He still holds the Norwegian national record with 69.62 metres, achieved in 1986.[2] He attended Western Maryland College, Penn State University and BYU, receiving a BS degree and a Masters from BYU. While attending BYU, he was coached by the legendary, world record holder Jay Silvester.

As a Masters Athlete, he has an All Time World ranking of 8th in the men's 35-39 (2 kg.) class.[3]

Hjeltnes coached athletes at the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY from 1999 until 2013. While coaching at USMA West Point, his athletes produced 40 Patriot League Championships, 3 NCAA All-Americans, 30 NCAA Regional Qualifiers, and 2 Academic All-Americans.[4]

Hjeltnes was hired as the throws coach at Auburn University In 2013.[5][6]

Doping[edit]

Hjeltnes tested positive for anabolic steroids in 1977 and was banned from sports for one year. He was the first Norwegian ever to test positive. Hjeltnes publicly admitted to have been doping and he also cooperated with Jan Hedenstad to write a book about it, called Dopet ('Doped'), published in 1979 (ISBN 8205120021).[7]

Achievements[edit]

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
Representing  Norway
1988 Olympic Games Seoul, South Korea 7th Discus 64.94 m
1984 Olympic Games Los Angeles, California 4th Discus 65.28 m
1976 Olympic Games Montreal, Canada 7th Discus 63.06 m
1986 European Athletics Championships Stuttgart, West Germany 4th Discus 65.60 m
1983 World Championships Helsinki, Finland 9th Discus 62.26 m

References[edit]

External links[edit]