Chrysondion

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Coordinates: 40°52′N 20°11′E / 40.867°N 20.183°E / 40.867; 20.183

Epirus in antiquity

Chrysondyon (Greek: Χρυσονδύων; acc. Χρυσονδύωνα[1]) was an ancient Greek[2][3] city of the Dassaretae[4][5] to the north of Mount Tomor in Chaonia at the border of the region of Epirus[1] with Illyria. The earliest coins yielded by excavation are of Philip II of Macedon;[6] the massive circuit wall with a fine gateway dates probably to the late 4th century BC. Names are preserved on tile stamps and amphora seals; weapons, tools, and fibulas were found. Kodrion figured in the wars between Macedon and Rome.[7] It was in the general vicinity of Antipatreia and Gertous. The name could also be found as Codrio or Codrion in Latin.[8]

It is probably[9] located in the district of Gramsh, modern Albania.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Polyb. 5.108.2,"ῆς δὲ Δασσαρήτιδος προσηγμένον πόλεις, τὰς μὲν φόβῳ, τὰς δ’ ἐπαγγελίαις, Ἀντιπάτρειαν, Χρυσονδύωνα, Γερτοῦντα, πολλὴν δὲ καὶ τῆς συνορούσης τούτοις Μακεδονίας"
  2. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 6: The Fourth Century BC by D. M. Lewis (Editor), John Boardman (Editor), Simon Hornblower (Editor), M. Ostwald (Editor), 1994, ISBN 0-521-23348-8, page 423, "These Dassareti not to be confused with the Greek speaking Dexari or Dessaretae of the ,"
  3. ^ Epirus: the geography, the ancient remains, the history and topography of Epirus and adjacent areas by Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond,1967,page 607,"The other two towns, Chrysondyon and Gertous, probably lay on Scerdilaidas route, between Lycnidus and Antipatrea"
  4. ^ The Illyrians by John Wilkes,page 98,"the Dassaretae possessed several towns...Chrysondym, Gertous or Gerous..."
  5. ^ L'Épire de la mort de Pyrrhos à la conquête romaine."cites de Dassaretide, Antipatreia, Chrysondyon et Gerous"
  6. ^ The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites Richard Stillwell, William L. MacDonald, Marian Holland McAllister, Stillwell, Richard, MacDonald, William L., McAlister, Marian Holland, Ed., To the N of Mt. Tomor. The earliest coins yielded by excavation are of Philip II of Macedon; the massive circuit wall with a fine gateway dates probably to the late 4th century BC. Names are preserved on tile stamps and amphora seals; weapons, tools, and fibulas were found. Kodrion figured in the wars between Macedon and Rome (Livy 31.27.4).
  7. ^ (Livy 31.27.4)
  8. ^ Latin Dictionary Founded on Andrew's Edition of Freund's Latin Dictionary. by Charlton T. Lewis, Charles Short, William Freund, ISBN 0-19-864201-6,Revised edition (December 31, 1956),page 358
  9. ^ A History of Macedonia: Historical geography and prehistory by Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond, Guy Thompson Griffith,1972,page 100,"into the district of Gramsh, is probably to be identified with Codrion"