Kokang people

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The Kokang people (Chinese: 果敢族; pinyin: Guŏgăn Zú) are an ethnic group of Burma (also known as Myanmar). They are Mandarin-speaking Han Chinese[1] living in Kokang Special Region.[2] In 1997, it was estimated that the Kokang people, together with more recently immigrated Yunnanese, constituted 30–40 percent of Burma's ethnic Chinese population.[3]

Most Kokang are descendants of Chinese speakers who migrated to what is now Shan State in the 18th century. In the mid-17th century, the Yang clan, a Chinese military house that fled with the Ming loyalists from Nanjing to Yunnan Province, and later migrated to the Shan State in eastern Burma, forming a feudal state called Kokang. From the 1960s to 1989, the area was ruled by the Communist Party of Burma, and after the dissolution of that party in 1989 it became a special region of Burma.

The group has an army called the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army; in August 2009 they clashed with Tatmadaw (Burmese military junta) troops in a conflict known as the Kokang incident.

Notable Kokang[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Burma has other, non-Kokang populations of Han Chinese; depending on what area of China they originally immigrated from, these populations speak Yunnan Mandarin, Hokkien, Cantonese, Hakka, and Hainanese. See Mya Than (1997). "The Ethnic Chinese in Myanmar and their Identity". In Leo Suryadinata. Ethnic Chinese as Southeast Asians. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. pp. 117–8. ISBN 981-3055-58-8. 
  2. ^ Ng Han Guan. "Ethnic rebels flee Myanmar, abandoning weapons and uniforms for safe haven in south China". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 30 August 2009. 
  3. ^ Mya Than (1997). "The Ethnic Chinese in Myanmar and their Identity". In Leo Suryadinata. Ethnic Chinese as Southeast Asians. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. pp. 119–20. ISBN 981-3055-58-8.