Komi-Permyak Okrug

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Coordinates: 59°01′N 54°40′E / 59.017°N 54.667°E / 59.017; 54.667

Location map

Komi-Permyak Okrug (Russian: Ко́ми-Пермя́цкий о́круг, Komi-Permyatsky okrug; Komi: Перым Коми кытш), or Permyakia[1] is a territory with special status within Perm Krai, Russia. Its administrative center is the town of Kudymkar. Population: 116,157 (2010 Census);[2] 136,076 (2002 Census);[3] 159,689 (1989 Census).[4]

It was a federal subject of Russia (an autonomous okrug) until December 1, 2005. It was known as Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug (Russian: Ко́ми-Пермя́цкий автоно́мный о́круг; Komi: Перым-Коми автономия кытш) at the time.

Geography[edit]

Area: 32,770 km². Location: foothills of the Ural Mountains, upper basin of the Kama River.

History[edit]

Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug was established on February 26, 1925. It was an administrative division for Komi-Permyaks, a branch of the Komis, within Perm Oblast. After a referendum held in October 2004, the autonomous okrug was merged with Perm Oblast to form Perm Krai. The referendum was held both in Komi-Permyak Autonomous Okrug and Perm Oblast, and the majority of citizens of both regions voted for merging.

Administrative divisions[edit]

Location of Komi-Permyak Okrug within Perm Krai

(prior to December 1, 2005)

(after December 1, 2005)

Demographics[edit]

Vital statistics[edit]

Source: Russian Federal State Statistics Service
Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000)
1970 210 3 701 1 993 1 708 17.6 9.5 8.1
1975 188 3 605 1 999 1 606 19.2 10.6 8.5
1980 170 3 259 2 572 687 19.2 15.1 4.0
1985 162 3 360 2 444 916 20.7 15.1 5.7
1990 146 2 660 1 931 729 18.3 13.3 5.0
1991 146 2 384 2 043 341 16.3 14.0 2.3
1992 147 2 267 2 111 156 15.4 14.3 1.1
1993 147 2 100 2 547 - 447 14.3 17.3 -3.0
1994 146 1 946 2 831 - 885 13.3 19.4 -6.1
1995 144 1 761 2 556 - 795 12.2 17.7 -5.5
1996 143 1 749 2 510 - 761 12.2 17.6 -5.3
1997 141 1 724 2 607 - 883 12.2 18.4 -6.2
1998 140 1 640 2 250 - 610 11.7 16.1 -4.4
1999 139 1 696 2 495 - 799 12.2 17.9 -5.7
2000 138 1 652 2 724 -1 072 11.9 19.7 -7.8
2001 137 1 610 2 700 -1 090 11.7 19.7 -7.9
2002 136 1 700 3 090 -1 390 12.5 22.8 -10.2
2003 133 1 675 3 057 -1 382 12.6 22.9 -10.4
2004 130 1 619 3 080 -1 461 12.4 23.6 -11.2
2005 127
2006 125 1 672 2 813 -1 141 13.4 22.6 -9.2
2007 122 1 845 2 566 - 721 15.1 21.0 -5.9
2008 120 2 109 2 523 - 414 17.6 21.0 -3.4
2009 118 2 144 2 447 - 303 18.1 20.7 -2.6
2010 116 2 253 2 497 - 244 19.4 21.5 -2.1
2011 114 2,072 2,148 - 76 18.2 18.8 -0.6

Ethnic groups[edit]

According to the 2002 Census, Komi-Permyaks make up 59.0% of the okrug's population. Other groups include Russians (38.2%), Tatars (1,100, or 0.8%), Ukrainians (706, or 0.5%), Belarusians (672, or 0.5%), and a host of other groups, each accounting for less than 0.5% of the total population.

Ethnic
group
1926 census 1959 census 1970 census 1979 census 1989 census 2002 census
Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  %
Komi-Permyaks 117,429 77.0% 125,917 58.0% 123,621 58.3% 105,574 61.4% 95,415 60.2% 80,327 59.0%
Russians 34,814 22.8% 71,381 32.9% 76,340 36.0% 59,760 34.7% 57,272 36.1% 51,946 38.2%
Others 251 0.2% 19,740 9.1% 12,180 5.7% 6,705 3.9% 5,839 3.7% 3,803 2.8%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Encyclopedia Encarta. Entry on Permyakia[dead link]
  2. ^ "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. 2011. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, its federal districts, federal subjects, districts, urban localities, rural localities—administrative centers, and rural localities with population of over 3,000]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. May 21, 2004. Retrieved February 9, 2012. 
  4. ^ Demoscope Weekly (1989). "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров." [All Union Population Census of 1989. Present population of union and autonomous republics, autonomous oblasts and okrugs, krais, oblasts, districts, urban settlements, and villages serving as district administrative centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года (All-Union Population Census of 1989) (in Russian). Institute of Demographics of the State University—Higher School of Economics. Retrieved February 9, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Lallukka, Seppo; Liudmila Nikitina (March 2001). "Continuing with Perm, turning to Syktyvkar, or standing on one's own? The debate about the status of the Komi-Permiak Autonomous Okrug". Nationalities Papers 29 (1): 129–151. doi:10.1080/00905990120036411.