Koryak Okrug

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Coordinates: 59°05′N 159°56′E / 59.083°N 159.933°E / 59.083; 159.933

Location of Koryak Okrug in Russia in 2007

Koryak Okrug (Russian: Коря́кский о́круг, Koryaksky okrug; Koryak: Чав’чываокруг, Chav'chyvaokrug), or Koryakia, is an administrative division of Kamchatka Krai, Russia.[1] It was a federal subject of Russia (an autonomous okrug of Kamchatka Oblast) from 1931[2] until July 1, 2007, when it merged with Kamchatka Oblast. Prior to the merger, it was called Koryak Autonomous Okrug (Коря́кский автоно́мный о́круг). Its administrative center is the urban locality (an urban-type settlement) of Palana. Population: 18,759 (2010 Census);[3] 25,157 (2002 Census);[4] 39,363 (1989 Census).[5]

Demographics[edit]

As of the 2002 Census, Koryaks constituted about a quarter of the population. At the time it had the smallest population of all the federal subjects, despite being ranked seventeenth in size, at 301,500 square kilometers (116,400 sq mi), encompassing part of the northern half of Kamchatka Peninsula.

Vital statistics[edit]

Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000)
1970 31 683 356 327 22.0 11.5 10.5
1975 33 706 374 332 21.4 11.3 10.1
1980 35 701 351 350 20.0 10.0 10.0
1985 37 793 289 504 21.4 7.8 13.6
1990 38 635 342 293 16.9 9.1 7.8
1991 38 623 350 273 16.6 9.3 7.3
1992 37 611 369 242 16.7 10.1 6.6
1993 34 459 433 26 13.3 12.6 0.8
1994 32 433 460 - 27 13.5 14.3 -0.8
1995 31 382 481 - 99 12.5 15.8 -3.2
1996 29 374 436 - 62 12.7 14.8 -2.1
1997 29 373 400 - 27 13.0 13.9 -0.9
1998 28 396 355 41 14.2 12.7 1.5
1999 27 319 397 - 78 11.8 14.7 -2.9
2000 26 289 391 - 102 11.0 14.9 -3.9
2001 26 298 390 - 92 11.6 15.1 -3.6
2002 25 310 376 - 66 12.3 14.9 -2.6
2003 24 268 462 - 194 11.0 19.0 -8.0
2004 24 339 463 - 124 14.4 19.7 -5.3
2005 23 294 466 - 172 12.9 20.5 -7.6
2006 22 270 366 - 96 12.3 16.7 -4.4
2007 21 280 351 - 71 13.2 16.5 -3.3
2008 20 267 368 - 101 13.0 18.0 -4.9
2009 20 268 365 - 97 13.6 18.5 -4.9
2010 19 233 397 - 164 12.3 20.9 -8.7

Ethnic groups[edit]

About 40% of the total population is indigenous, the Koryaks being the largest such group. They are, however, outnumbered by the ethnic Russians.

Ethnic
group
1939 Census 1959 Census 1970 Census 1979 Census 1989 Census 2002 Census 2010 Census
Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  %
Koryaks 6,855 27.2% 5,010 18.2% 5,893 19.1% 5,660 16.2% 6,572 16.5% 6,710 26.7% 5,676 30.3%
Chukchis 1,267 5.0% 1,062 3.9% 1,164 3.8% 1,222 3.5% 1,460 3.7% 1,412 5.6% 1,327 7.1%
Itelmens 801 3.2% 900 3.3% 970 3.1% 1,002 2.9% 1,179 3.0% 1,181 4.7% 948 5.1%
Evens 714 2.8% 520 1.9% 613 2.0% 476 1.4% 713 1.8% 751 3.0% 743 4.0%
Russians 13,794 54.8% 16,674 60.6% 19,522 63.1% 22,493 64.5% 24,773 62.0% 12,719 50.6% 8,669 46.2%
Ukrainians 847 3.4% 1,310 4.8% 1,186 3.8% 1,999 5.7% 2,896 7.3% 1,029 4.1% 474 2.5%
Others 882 3.5% 2,049 7.4% 1,569 5.1% 1,999 5.7% 2,347 5.9% 1,355 5.4%
Total 25,160 27,525 30,917 34,850 39,940 25,157 18,759

2006 earthquake[edit]

Map of Koryakia

On April 20, 2006, Kamchatka Peninsula was struck by a major earthquake. The 7.7-magnitude tremor had its epicenter near the village of Tilichiki. The Koryakia branch of the Russian Office of Emergency Situations said some area residents were injured but there were no fatalities.

The quake occurred at about noon local time Friday, so residents were awake and not caught in their beds.

The United States Geological Survey reported a series of at least fifty smaller aftershocks in the area and immediately offshore. They ranged from 4.1 to 6.5 magnitudes on the Richter scale.

Bruce Presgrave, a geophysicist with the U.S.G.S. in Colorado, said the quake was relatively shallow. He estimated that about 2,000 people live close enough to the epicenter to have felt its full force.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Федеральный конституционный закон №2-ФКЗ от 12 июля 2006 года "Об образовании в составе Российской Федерации нового субъекта Российской Федерации в результате объединения Камчатской области и Корякского автономного округа". Статья 5. (Federal Constitutional Law #2-FKZ of July 12, 2006 On Creation of a New Federal Subject Within the Russian Federation as a Result of the Merger of Kamchatka Oblast and Koryak Autonomous Okrug. Article 5) (Russian)
  2. ^ Chaussonnet, p. 29
  3. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  4. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (May 21, 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000] (XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian). Retrieved August 9, 2014. 
  5. ^ Demoscope Weekly (1989). "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров" [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года[All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. Retrieved August 9, 2014. 

Sources[edit]

  • Chaussonnet, Valerie (1995) Native Cultures of Alaska and Siberia. Arctic Studies Center. Washington, D.C. 112p. ISBN 1-56098-661-1