Kotlet schabowy

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Kotlet schabowy
Kotlet schabowy.jpg
Kotlet schabowy with home fries.
Alternative name(s) Schabowy, Schaboszczak
Type Main
Place of origin Poland
Serving temperature Hot
Main ingredient(s) Pork or Chicken or turkey, eggs, lard or oil, spices, breadcrumbs, flour

Kotlet schabowy [ˈkɔtlɛt sxaˈbɔvɨ] is a Polish variety of pork breaded cutlet coated with breadcrumbs similar to Viennese schnitzel,[1] but made of pork tenderloin (with the bone or without), or with pork chop. There's also the Polish variety of the chicken breast cutlet coated with breadcrumbs looking somewhat similar, or the turkey cutlet coated with breadcrumbs (kotlet z indyka [ˈkɔtlɛt z ˈindɨka]) made the same way.

The history of the Polish pork cutlet schabowy dates back to the 19th century. The collection of different recipes for cutlets such as schabowy is featured in an 1860 cookbook by Lucyna Ćwierczakiewiczowa entitled 365 obiadów za pięć złotych (365 Dinners for five złotys), but missing from the 1786 cookbook by Wojciech Wielądek called Kucharz doskonały (The Perfect Chef), thus suggesting, that the dish wasn't known (or at least, wasn't popular) before the 19th century. Typical ingredients include: eggs, lard or oil, spices, pork tenderloin with or without bone, breadcrumbs and flour.

Pork tenderloin is cut into 1 inch slices and pounded with mallet until it becomes thinner and soft. Eggs and spices are combined on a separate plate and lightly beaten. The meat is dipped in flour, then in egg, and then covered in breadcrumbs. The oil is heated in a frying pan till it starts to sizzle and the meat is placed onto it, then turned over a couple of times. Served hot. Kotlet schabowy can be served with mashed potatoes, rice or pasta, pierogi, fried mushrooms, cooked vegetables (seared cabbage),[2] with salads or with coleslaw.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mieczysław Czuma, Leszek Mazan. Austriackie gadanie czyli encyklopedia galicyjska. 1998, page 465. Quote: "...jedna z najpopularniejszych potraw w całej byłej monarchii austro-węgierskiej, w wersji wieprzowej, jako kotlet schabowy - w całej Polsce. Pierwotna nazwa costelette alla milanese, gdyż potrawa (smażona na maśle) pochodzi z Włoch. Zwrócił na nią uwagę w czasie kampanii włoskich dowódca wojsk austriackich w Lombardii i Wenecji sędziwy marszałek Radetzky."
  2. ^ Pork cutlets with cabbage (recipes) at Pl magazine.net.

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