Kozyrev mirror

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A Kozyrev mirror, in Russian esoteric literature from 1990s, is a device made from aluminum (sometimes from glass, or reflecting mirror-like material) spiral shape surfaces, which, according to a non-proved hypothesis, are able to focus different types of radiation including that coming from biological objects.[citation needed] They are named after the famous astronomer Nikolai Aleksandrovich Kozyrev, though they were neither invented nor described by him.

Kozyrev mirrors were used in experiments related to extrasensory perception (ESP), conducted in the Institute of Experimental Medicine of Siberia, division of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Humans, allocated into the cylindrical spirals (usually 1.5 rotations clockwise, made of polished aluminum) allegedly experienced anomalous psycho-physical sensations, which had been recorded in the minutes of the research experiments.[1]

Kozyrev mirrors were shown in a documentary on the Russian state TV channel[2] and articles about them were published in tabloid newspapers in Russia and Ukraine[3] but not in scientific journals.

During one of early experiments in the arctic village of Dixon, scientists placed an ancient symbol of Trinity into a mirror installation. Almost immediately there formed a field of force around the setup. The experiment was led by Vlail Kaznacheev MD, PhD, Academic Member of the Russian Academy of Medical Science.

A 1998 Russian patent, RU2122446, "Device for the correction of man's psychosomatic diseases", relates to Kozyrev mirrors.[4]

In 2014 a Czech Republic group attempted, but failed, to crowdfund 17,000-20,000 Euros for development of Kozyrev mirrors.[5]

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