Krćevac

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Krćevac
Крћевац
Village
Krćevac is located in Serbia
Krćevac
Krćevac
Location in Serbia
Coordinates: 44°18′2″N 20°41′17″E / 44.30056°N 20.68806°E / 44.30056; 20.68806Coordinates: 44°18′2″N 20°41′17″E / 44.30056°N 20.68806°E / 44.30056; 20.68806
Country  Serbia
Region Šumadija
District Šumadija District
Municipality Topola
Population (2002)
 • Total 775
 • Ethnicities Serbs 98.7%, Montenegrins 1.03%, Croats 0.12%, Muslims 0.12%

Krćevac (Cyrillic: Крћевац) is a village in the Topola municipality of the Šumadija District in Central Serbia, located 3.9 km from Zagorica and 5.2 km from Topola.

Etymology[edit]

The name "Krćevac" stems from "krčanje" which translates to "burning/clearing of forest". The region of Šumadija was/is densely wooded and so the village owes its name to the intense forest clearing effort that was undertaken when the area was settled. Local lore holds that the area of today's Krćevac burned for three months before the land became clear for farming.

Demographics[edit]

According to the 1991 census data, the population was 794. According to the 2002 census, this had declined slightly to 775, composed of 636 adults, with an average age of 42.9 years (41.9 years among males and 43.8 years among females). There were 216 households in the village with an average of 3.59 members per household.

In 2002, Serbs constituted 98.7% of the population, Montenegrins 1.03%, Croats 0.12%, and Muslims 0.12%.

Changes in Number of Residents of Krćevac during the Twentieth Century

Historic Sites[edit]

Krćevac is home to a fountain built by Alexander Karađorđević on 29 September 1858. Karađorđević built the fountain on the land that he had known, and tended to, since childhood. The land was the same location of Karađorđe Petrović's farm fields. The land was sold by the House of Obrenović during the 1868-1883 period.

The Ottoman Turks referred to Krćevac as Karađorđe's House of Hajduks ('ajdučka kuća) due to the wooded areas of Krćevac serving as a safe haven for those who fought to abolish Turkish rule during the First Serbian Uprising.[1]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ www.glas-javnosti.rs