Krasnopol (Weapon)

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30F39 Krasnopol guided projectile.

The 30F39 Krasnopol is a Russian 152/155 mm cannon-launched, fin-stabilized, base bleed-assisted, semi-automatic laser-guided, explosive projectile. It is intended to engage small hard point ground targets such as tanks, self-propelled howitzers, or other high-value mobile targets.

In February 1986 the complex Krasnopol was adopted by the Soviet Army and began mass production in Izhmash and Izhmeh factories.[1]

The 2K25 Krasnopol complex[2] consists of the 30F39 guided shell; a 1D22, 1D20, or 1D15 laser target designator (LTD); and the 1A35 shot synchronization system. The laser designation system has a range of 5 km (3.1 mi), while the projectile itself has a range of 20 km (12 mi)[3] and a target seeker radius of 1 km (0.62 mi).[4]

The system functions as follows. The complex's laser target designator / laser rangefinder is used to mark a target that has entered a pre-selected killzone. A guided shell is then fired. The firing unit uses their 1A35K command device to send a signal via a communications link confirming the firing of the projectile to the 1A35I observation post device at the battery command observation post. The laser target designator is then used to guide the round down to the target. Upon destruction of the initial target, the LTD operator shifts the designator to subsequent targets upwind (from the previous engagement) to reduce smoke and dust interference with the designator.[5]

The original model of the Krasnopol was designed to be used with former Soviet-Bloc artillery systems of 152 mm (6.0 in), such as D-20, 2S3 Akatsiya, 2A65 (Msta-B). Krasnopol carries a 20.5 kg (45 lb) high explosive fragmentation warhead. The entire missile weighs 50 kg (110 lb). However, its length made it incompatible with the autoloader of the 2S19 152mm Self-Propelled Gun.

The Krasnopol-Modernezatsya (or Krasnopol-M) was made with a shorter length to enable it to be used with autoloader-equipped guns. It also comes in an alternate 155 mm (6.1 in) bore to allow it to be used with NATO-standard howitzers of the same class.

Krasnopol is capable of hitting targets moving at speeds up to 36 km/h (22 mph).

See also[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.kbptula.ru/ru/novosti/nagrady-i-yubilei/130-yubilej-tulskogo-sozdatelya-vysokotochnykh-artillerijskikh-boepripasov
  2. ^ http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/row/krasnopol.htm FAS Williams, Walter, Threat Update: Krasnopol--A Laser-Guided Projectile for Tube Artillery Foreign Military Studies Office, Fort Leavenworth
  3. ^ Jane's Ammunition Handbook 1994 (Alexandria: Jane's Information Group Inc., 1993), p. 210. ISBN 0-7106-1167-6.
  4. ^ http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/row/krasnopol.htm FAS Williams, Walter, Threat Update: Krasnopol--A Laser-Guided Projectile for Tube Artillery Foreign Military Studies Office, Fort Leavenworth
  5. ^ http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/row/krasnopol.htm FAS Williams, Walter, Threat Update: Krasnopol--A Laser-Guided Projectile for Tube Artillery Foreign Military Studies Office, Fort Leavenworth

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