Kristi Harrower

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Kristi Harrower
Kristi Harrower - London 2012 Olympics Womens Basketball (Australia v Russia).jpg
Kristi Harrower in 2012
Point guard
Born (1975-03-04) 4 March 1975 (age 39)
Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Nationality Australian
Height 162 cm (5 ft 4 in)[1]
Weight 139 lb (63 kg)
WNBA career 1998–present
Profile WNBA player profile
WNBA teams
Phoenix Mercury (1998–1999)
Minnesota Lynx (2001–2005)
Los Angeles Sparks (2009)
Non-WNBA teams
Melbourne Tigers (1991)
Australian Institute of Sport (1992–1993)
Adelaide Lightning (1994)
Melbourne Tigers (1998–2000)
GoldZack Wuppertal (2000–2001)
Aix-en-Provence (2002–2005)
US Valenciennes (2005–2007)
UMMC Ekaterinburg (2007–2008)
Bendigo Spirit (2008–present)

Kristi Harrower (born 4 March 1975 in Bendigo, Victoria) is an Australian professional basketball player, who three times (2000, 2004 and 2008) won the silver medal with the Australian Women's Team at the Summer Olympics, and also the bronze in 2012. She played in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) from 1998 to 2005 for the Phoenix Mercury and Minnesota Lynx.

Personal[edit]

Harrower was born on 4 March 1975,[2] and calls Bendigo her hometown.[3] She is 163 centimetres (64 in) tall[2][4] and weights 139 pounds (63 kg).[4]

In 2009, her grandmother passed away.[5] She was featured in the WNBL's 2009 league calendar.[6] Harrower had an injury in 2012 to her Achilles and could not run on it for a while.[7]

Basketball[edit]

Harrower is a guard.[2] She plays point guard.[8] She is an Australian Institute of Sport alumni and the programme considers her one of their success stories.[9]

As a competitor at the 1994 Australian Under-20 national championships, Harrower won the Bob Staunton Award.[10] In 1992 and 1993, she had a scholarship with the Australian Institute of Sport.[11][12] In 2008, she was featured as a basketball star on myFiba.[6]

Professional basketball[edit]

Harrower has played professional basketball for over twenty years.[3] In 2006, she played for Valenciennes in France.[13]

WNBA[edit]

She entered the WNBA as an undrafted player.[4] Her first team she played with was the Phoenix Mercury, whom she signed with before the start of the 1998 season.[4] In her two seasons with the team, she played in 62 games.[4] She joined the Minnesota Lynx in 2000 along with Mercury players Marlies Askamp and Angela Aycock as part of a trade that saw Tonya Edwards and Trisha Fallon go from Minnesota to Phoenix.[4][14] She played for the Lynx in 2003, where she averaged 2.8 points and 2.3 assists per game.[4] She ended her Lynx career in 2005 having played 96 games while averaging of 3.8 ppg, 2.4 apg and 1.8 rpg.[14]

In 2009, Harrower was playing for the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA.[5] She missed three games that season in order to attend her grandmother's funeral in Australia.[5]

WNBL[edit]

Harrower played for Bendigo in 2008/2009[6] and was with the team again for the 2009/2010 season where she was the WNBL's MVP.[15][16] She resigned with the Spirit in October 2009.[16] She played for the Bendigo Spirit in the 2010/2011 season,[17][18] wearing number 19. She had a three point shooting percentage of 23%. She was played injured most of the season, with problems in her shoulder and knee. She averaged 13.8 points a game, 5.5 rebounds a game and 5.2 assists a game.[18] She was the team's general manager that year.[3] Her team started off with a record of 1–4.[3] In a November 2010 game against the Adelaide Lightning, she scored 14 points and 8 assists in a 91–79 win for the Spirit.[19] She played for the Bendigo Spirit in 2011/2012.[2][7][20][21] Her father, Bernie Harrower, was the team's coach.[22] In January 2012, she made a clutch shot for her team that helped them beat Canberra.[22]

National team[edit]

Harrower is a member of the Australia women's national basketball team and has been described as the national team's pocket dynamo.[16] She was a member of the 1998 Australian Senior Women's Team that won a bronze medal at the World Championships in Germany.[23] She was a member of the 1999 Australian senior women's team.[23]

She was a member of the 2000 Summer Olympics team that won a silver medal.[7][23] Going into the Olympics, her team was ranked third in the world.[24] In 2002, she was a member of the Australian Senior Women's Team that won a silver medal in the World Championships in Spain.[25] She was a member of the Australian senior team that won a silver medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics.[7][26] She played in eight games at the 2004 Games, where she averaged 8 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.8 assists per game.[4]

Harrower was a member of the 2005 Opals.[27][28] In 2006, she was a member of the Australian women's senior team that won a gold medal at the World Championships in Brazil.[29] In March 2007, she was named to the national team what would prepare for the 2008 Summer Olympics.[30] In 2008, she did not participate in the Good Luck Beijing 2008 held in China in the lead up to the Olympics because of a commitment to her European club.[31] She was a member of the 2008 Summer Olympics Australian women's team that won a silver medal at the Olympics.[7][32][33][34]

In June 2010, Harrower was viewed by national team coach Carrie Graf as one of a quartet of strong players that would represent Australia in a tour of China, the United States and Europe in the next few months.[35] In July 2010, she participated in a four-day training camp and one game test match against the United States in Connecticut.[35] In 2010, she participated in the Salamanca Invitational Basketball Tournament in Spain. Her team beat Spain 85–64. They also beat the United States. She missed the game against Spain because she injured her ankle.[36] In 2010, she was a member of the senior women's national team that competed at the World Championships in the Czech Republic.[37] She missed a three game test series against China in Queensland in July 2011 because of an injury.[38] In July 2011, she participated in the Olympic qualification competition. She was returning to the team following an injury.[38][39]

Harrower was named to the 2012 Australia women's national basketball team.[40] In February 2012, she was named to a short list of 24 eligible players to represent Australia at the Olympics.[2] She was scheduled to participate in the national team training camp held from 14 to 18 May 2012 at the Australian Institute of Sport.[8] She made the 2012 Olympic Squad cut down to 14 players, and won the bronze medal.[41][42]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kristi Harrower". london2012.olympics.com.au. Australian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "London 2012 – 2012 Australian Opals squad named". Australian Olympic Committee. 16 February 2012. Retrieved 2012-05-02. 
  3. ^ a b c d Basketball Australia; Smith-Gander, Diane, eds. (2011). "Harrower Shows the Spirit for Best Season Ever". IiNet WNBL Finals Series (2010/2011 ed.) (WNBL): 14–15. Official Programme 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Lynx: Minnesota Lynx Re-Sign Guard Kristi Harrower". Wnba.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  5. ^ a b c "Los Angeles Sparks guard Kristi Harrower out three games to attend grandmother's funeral — ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. 26 August 2009. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  6. ^ a b c Nagy, Boti (31 December 2008). "Pin-up girls hit market". Adelaide Now. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Travis King. "Fit Kristi eyes off London Olympics — Local News — Sport — Basketball". Bendigo Advertiser. Retrieved 2012-05-02. 
  8. ^ a b "AUS — Opals announce training camp squad". FIBA. Retrieved 6 May 2012. 
  9. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 41. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  10. ^ Brad Graham Creative, ed. (2012). "The Bob Staunton Award". Play Up (19–25 February ed.) (South Melbourne, Australia: Basketball Australia): 8. Official Event Program 
  11. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 63. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  12. ^ "Past Athletes : Australian Institute of Sport : Australian Sports Commission". Ausport.gov.au. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  13. ^ "'Warhorse' Jackson heads team for world champs — Basketball — Sport". smh.com.au. 8 August 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  14. ^ a b "Lynx: Lynx Renounce Rights to Guard Kristi Harrower". Wnba.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  15. ^ Basketball Australia; Smith-Gander, Diane, eds. (2011). "2010 NBL/WNBL Awards Dinner". IiNet WNBL Finals Series (2010/2011 ed.) (WNBL): 17. Official Programme 
  16. ^ a b c Nagy, Boti (6 October 2009). "Kristi Harrower shows a new Spirit". Adelaide Now. Retrieved 2012-05-06. 
  17. ^ "Jackson, Taylor to lead Opals into worlds — ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)". Abc.net.au. 19 August 2010. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  18. ^ a b Basketball Australia; Smith-Gander, Diane, eds. (2011). "Bendigo Spirit". IiNet WNBL Finals Series (2010/2011 ed.) (WNBL): 10–11. Official Programme 
  19. ^ "Spirit too strong for Lightning — ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)". Abc.net.au. 7 November 2010. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  20. ^ Travis King (17 February 2012). "Kristi eyes fourth Games — Local News — Sport — Basketball". Bendigo Advertiser. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  21. ^ Tanya Paolucci (15 October 2011). "Spirit strives to silence Bulleen's big guns — Local News — Sport — Basketball". Bendigo Advertiser. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  22. ^ a b Travis King (18 January 2012). "Harrower relives last-second shot in Spirit's dramatic victory on Canberra's court — Local News — Sport — Basketball". Bendigo Advertiser. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  23. ^ a b c Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 51. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  24. ^ Schaefer, Stephen (July 2000). "Having a Ball!". Sports woman (Brisbane, Aust.) 1 (3): 26–27. ISSN 1443-1823. 
  25. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 50. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  26. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 49. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  27. ^ "Anstey in from the cold to join Tigers — Basketball". www.theage.com.au. 10 March 2005. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  28. ^ "Jessica Foley Selected To 'Price Attack' Opals Team For 2005 :: Foley has set a school record with 66 three-pointers this season". Cstv.com. 9 March 2005. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  29. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 48. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  30. ^ 12 March 2007 11:30PM (12 March 2007). "Phillips keeps Opals place". Adelaide Now. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  31. ^ "News Article". SportsAustralia.com. 8 April 2008. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  32. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 46. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  33. ^ "Top-strength Opals set for last frontier". Canberra Times. 4 July 2008. Retrieved 1 May 2012. 
  34. ^ "Jackson, Taylor to again lead the Opals". Wwos.ninemsn.com.au. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  35. ^ a b "Opals hit road for world title lead-up". Wwos.ninemsn.com.au. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  36. ^ "Opals down Spain in final tune-up". Wwos.ninemsn.com.au. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  37. ^ Australian Institute of Sport; Basketball Australia (2011). AIS Basketball 2011. Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 45. This is a booklet published by the Australian Sport Commission, has a copyright notice on the page following the cover page. 
  38. ^ a b "Flanagan ruled out of Opals series — ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)". Abc.net.au. 27 July 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  39. ^ "Opals count down to Olympics". Wwos.ninemsn.com.au. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 
  40. ^ "Basketball Australia : 2012 Squad". Basketball Australia. 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2012. 
  41. ^ 20 May 2012 12:16PM (20 May 2012). "Opals squad trimmed to 14". Fox Sports. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  42. ^ "London 2012 Women's Basketball". www.olympic.org. IOC. Retrieved 25 August 2014. 

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