Krohn Conservatory

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Krohn Conservatory at Eden Park
KrohnConservatory.jpg
Krohn Conservatory in Eden Park
Type Conservatory
Created 1933
Operated by City of Cincinnati Park Board
Visitors 300,000

The Irwin M. Krohn Conservatory is a conservatory located in Eden Park within Cincinnati, Ohio in the United States.

History[edit]

The conservatory was completed in 1933, replacing smaller greenhouses that had stood in Eden Park since 1894.[1] Originally known only as the Eden Park Greenhouse, in 1937 it was renamed in honor of Irwin M. Krohn, who served as Board of Park Commissioner[2] from 1912 to 1948. The architect firm Rapp & Meacham designed the conservatory in the Art Deco style, in the form of a Gothic arch.[3][4]

A 1966 hailstorm caused extensive damage to the conservatory, and the firm of Lord & Burnham was called to restore it.[5] The original wooden sashes were replaced with durable aluminum.[6]

Collection[edit]

It contains more than 3,500 plant species from all over the world,[7] with principal collections as follows:

  • Bonsai Collection - a collection of bonsai trees from the conservatory itself, the Bonsai Society of Greater Cincinnati, and private individuals.
  • Floral Display - home to six seasonal floral shows, with a permanent citrus tree collection of orange, kumquat, giant Ponderosa lemon, and grapefruit.
  • Orchid Display - approximately 75 blooming orchids at any time, from the conservatory's collection of thousands of orchids encompassing 17 genera. This display also includes a Monstera deliciosa.

Gallery[edit]

Entrance 
Waterfall 
Palm House 
Bonsai tree 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grace, Kevin (2002). "Cincinnati Revealed: A Photographic Heritage of the Queen City". Arcadia Publishing. p. 94. Retrieved 2013-06-05. 
  2. ^ Recchie, Nancy (2010). "Cincinnati Parks and Parkways". Arcadia Publishing. p. 74. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  3. ^ McPherson, Alan (2009). "Botanic Gems Indiana Public Gardens: Including Greater Chicago, Dayton, Cincinnati & Louisville". AuthorHouse. p. 112. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  4. ^ Federal Writers' Project (1943). "Cincinnati, a Guide to the Queen City and Its Neighbors". p. 281. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  5. ^ Bennett, Paul (Jul 1, 2000). "The Garden Lover's Guide to the Midwest". Princeton Architectural Press. p. 35. Retrieved 2013-06-04. 
  6. ^ Bennett, Paul (Jul 1, 2000). "The Garden Lover's Guide to the Midwest". Princeton Architectural Press. p. 35. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  7. ^ York, Tamara (Aug 24, 2009). "Eden Park Hike". Cincinnati CityBeat. Retrieved 2013-06-02. 
  8. ^ John H. Russell & Thomas S. Spencer (Jul 28, 2005). "Gardens Across America, East of the Mississippi: The American Horticulatural Society's Guide to American Public Gardens and Arboreta". Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 307. Retrieved 2013-05-08. 
  9. ^ Smith, Steve et al (2007). "A Cincinnati For the Senses". Cincinnati USA City Guide. Cincinnati Magazine. p. 12. Retrieved 2013-05-06. 
  10. ^ John H. Russell & Thomas S. Spencer (Jul 28, 2005). "Gardens Across America, East of the Mississippi: The American Horticulatural Society's Guide to American Public Gardens and Arboreta". Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 307. Retrieved 2013-05-08. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°06′55″N 84°29′25″W / 39.11524°N 84.49040°W / 39.11524; -84.49040