Kuan Chung-ming

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Kuan Chung-ming
管中閔
Kuan Chung-ming from VOA.jpg
Minister of the National Development Council of the Executive Yuan
Incumbent
Assumed office
22 January 2014
Deputy Hwang Wang-hsiang, Chen Chien-liang, Sung Yu-hsieh
Preceded by Position established
Minister of the Council for Economic Planning and Development of the Executive Yuan
In office
18 February 2013 – 21 January 2014
Deputy Hwang Wang-hsiang, Chen Chien-liang, Hsiao-hung Nancy Chen
Preceded by Yiin Chii-ming
Succeeded by Position abolished
Minister without Portfolio of the Executive Yuan[1]
Incumbent
Assumed office
6 February 2012
Personal details
Born 15 August 1956 (1956-08-15) (age 58)
Taipei, Taiwan
Nationality  Republic of China
Political party Naval Jack of the Republic of China.svg Kuomintang
Alma mater University of California, Davis
University of California, San Diego

Kuan Chung-ming (Chinese: 管中閔; pinyin: Guǎn Zhōngmǐn) is a politician in the Republic of China. He currently serves as the Minister of the National Development Council (NDC) of the Executive Yuan,[2] and Chair Professor in Department of Finance, National Taiwan University.[3]

ROC Council for Economic Planning and Development Ministry[edit]

Taiwan's Q1 2013 economic growth[edit]

Commenting on Taiwan's Q1 2013 economic growth at 1.54%, way lower than the forecast value of 3.26%, Kuan said that he was surprised that this was due to the low consumption by private sectors in Taiwan. He added that CEPD aimed for Taiwan's 4% overall economic growth in 2013, although it might be impossible knowing that Taiwan will need a straight 5% economic growth for the remaining quarters of the year. However, he added that investments in private sectors are still rising, an indication of a positive economic outlook.[4]

Taiwan's 2013 global competitiveness ranking decline[edit]

Commenting on Taiwan's 2013 global competitiveness ranking decline by the International Institute for Management Development in end of May 2013, Kuan said that it is not that Taiwan not improving themselves better, but other nations did better than Taiwan. He added that the business regulations have been liberated in Taiwan but not as much as what have been done in other countries.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]