Kuk

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This article is about a concept in ancient Egyptian mythology. For the abbreviation describing the Austro-Hungarian Empire, see k.u.k.. For other uses, see Kuk (disambiguation).

Kuk (also spelled as Kek and Keku) is the deification of the primordial concept of darkness in Egyptian mythology. In the Ogdoad cosmogony, his name meant darkness. As a concept, Kuk was viewed as androgynous, his female form being known as Kauket (also spelled as Keket), which is simply the female form of the word Kuk.[1]

Like all four dualistic concepts in the Ogdoad, Kuk's male form was depicted as a frog, or as a frog-headed man, and the female form as a snake, or a snake-headed woman. As a symbol of darkness, Kuk also represented obscurity and the unknown, and thus chaos.[2] Also, Kuk was seen as that which occurred before light, thus was known as the bringer-in of light.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seawright, Caroline. "Kek and Kauket, Deities of Darkness, Obscurity and Night". Retrieved 2008-08-22. "He was the god of the darkness of chaos" 
  2. ^ Seawright, Caroline. "Kek and Kauket, Deities of Darkness, Obscurity and Night". Retrieved 2008-08-22. "He was the god of the darkness of chaos"