Kukish languages

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kukish
Kuki/Chin
Ethnicity: Kuki = Chin, Mizo, Naga, Karbi, Mro
Geographic
distribution:
India, Burma, Bangladesh
Linguistic classification: Sino-Tibetan
Subdivisions:
Glottolog: kuki1246  (Kuki-Chin)[1]
karb1240  (Karbic)[2]
mani1292  (Manipuri)[3]

The Kukish languages, also known as Kuki-Chin (Kuki/Chin), Mizo/Kuki/Chin, or Kuki Naga, are a branch of 50 or so Tibeto-Burman languages spoken in northeastern India, western Burma and eastern Bangladesh. Most speakers of these languages are known as Kukī in Assamese and as Chin in Burmese; some also identify as Naga. The Mizo people are ethnically distinct.

Kukish is sometimes placed under Kuki-Chin–Naga, a geographical rather than linguistic grouping.

Subclassification[edit]

There is general agreement that the Karbi languages are related to, or part of, Kukish, but they are aberrant. However, Thurgood (2003) leaves Karbi unclassified within Tibeto-Burman.[4] The Mru language, once classified as Kukish, is now thought to be closer to Lolo–Burmese.

The internal classification of the Kukish languages proper has changed little in a century:

Bradley (1997) includes Meithei.[5] Ethnologue 16 had included several additional languages in Northern (or in the case of Darlong, Central) Kukish, but the 17th edition leaves them unclassified within Tibeto-Burman. They are:

Darlong, Monsang (Naga), Tarao (Naga), Ranglong, Sakachep.

The recently discovered Sorbung language may likely be a Kukish language, although it could also be a Tangkhulic language (Mortenson & Keogh 2011).[6]

Anu-Hkongso is sometimes labeled as Chin but is closer to Mru.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Kuki-Chin". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Karbic". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Manipuri". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  4. ^ Thurgood, Graham (2003) "A subgrouping of the Sino-Tibetan languages: The interaction between language contact, change, and inheritance." In G. Thurgood and R. LaPolla, eds., The Sino-Tibetan languages, pp 13–14. London: Routledge, ISBN 978-0-7007-1129-1.
  5. ^ Bradley, David (1997), "Tibeto-Burman languages and classification", in Tibeto-Burman languages of the Himalayas, Papers in South East Asian linguistics 14, Canberra: Pacific Linguistics, pp 1–71, ISBN 978-0-85883-456-9.
  6. ^ David Mortenson and Jennifer Keogh. 2011. "Sorbung, an Undocumented Language of Manipur: its Phonology and Place in Tibeto-Burman", in JEALS 4, vol 1.

References[edit]

  • George van Driem (2001) Languages of the Himalayas: An Ethnolinguistic Handbook of the Greater Himalayan Region. Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-12062-4.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]