Kulja, Western Australia

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Kulja
Western Australia
Kulja is located in Western Australia
Kulja
Kulja
Coordinates 30°30′S 117°19′E / 30.500°S 117.317°E / -30.500; 117.317Coordinates: 30°30′S 117°19′E / 30.500°S 117.317°E / -30.500; 117.317
Population 93 (2006 Census)[1]
Established 1928
Postcode(s) 6470
Elevation 321 m (1,053 ft)
Location
  • 253 km (157 mi) North East of Perth
  • 43 km (27 mi) North North West of Koorda
  • 64 km (40 mi) East of Dalwallinu
LGA(s) Shire of Koorda
State electorate(s) Central Wheatbelt
Federal Division(s) Durack

Kulja is a small town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia. The town is situated along the Bonnie Rock Burakin Road.

The area was charted in 1908 and the Indigenous Australian name of a local soak was recorded as Kulja. The townsite was originally established in the late 1920s as part of a railway siding on the Ejanding North Railway line. The townsite was gazetted in 1928 once a large enough local population had settled in the area.[2]

The surrounding areas produce wheat and other cereal crops. The town is a receival site for Cooperative Bulk Handling.[3]

History[edit]

Kulja had a post office between 1928 and 1973. There was also a post office called Kulja Railway Construction between 1929 and 1931.[4]

In 1932 the Wheat Pool of Western Australia announced that the town would have two grain elevators, each fitted with an engine, installed at the railway siding.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Kulja (State Suburb)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 7 October 2008. 
  2. ^ Western Australian Land Information Authority. "History of country town names". Retrieved 7 October 2008. 
  3. ^ "CBH receival sites". 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2013. 
  4. ^ Dzelme, John (1976) Place and Date Stamps of Western Australia, p. 103 Perth, W.A: published by the author
  5. ^ "Country elevators". The West Australian (Perth, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 6 July 1932. p. 10. Retrieved 6 April 2013.