Kunduz River

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The Kunduz River is a tributary of the Amu Darya in northern Afghanistan. It rises in the Hindu Kush, and in its upper reaches is known as the Surkhab River.

Course[edit]

The Kunduz rises in the glacier region on the north side of the Koh-i-Baba range in Bamiyan Province, some 20 km south west of the town of Bamiyan, where the river is known as the Bamiyan River. It flows east in a deep valley separating the western part of the Hindu Kush on the north from the Koh-i-Baba on the south. After about 50 km it bends sharp north, crossing the Hindu Kush range. It then turns east-north-east and enters Baghlan Province. There the river is known as the Surkhab.

It then parallels a northern spur of the Hindu Kush for more than 80 km, receiving many small tributaries on its right bank.

At the town of Doshi it receives the Andarab, a large tributary flowing from the east. It then flows north towards the Amu Darya, crossing Baghlan and Kunduz Provinces.

At Yakala-ye Zad, 30 km past the city of Kunduz, the river meets its largest tributary, the Khanabad River, shortly before discharging into the Amu Darya.

Basin[edit]

The basin of the Kunduz River covers almost all the province of Baghlan, the western part of Bamiyan Province and two-thirds of Takhar and Kunduz Provinces. Its area is estimated at 31,300 square kilometers.[1]

Flow rates[edit]

Flow rates of the river were observed for 15 years (1950-1965) at Pol-e Khomri, where the river reaches the Amu Darya plain.[2]

At Pol-e Khomri, annual mean flow was 67.6 m³ per second, from a basin of 17,250 square kilometres.

References[edit]

Coordinates: 37°00′15″N 68°15′54″E / 37.00417°N 68.26500°E / 37.00417; 68.26500