Kuo Lien Ying

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kuo Lien Ying
Kuo Lien Ying 2.jpg
Grandmaster Kuo Lien Ying
Born 1895 (1895)
Inner Mongolia, China
Died 1984 (aged 88–89)
Mongolia
Style Guang Ping Yang taijiquan
Notable students Kwok Wo Ngai
Website Guang Ping Yang Association

Kuo Lien Ying, (1895–1984) born in Inner Mongolia, China, was one of the most distinguished and revered martial artists of the twentieth century.[citation needed] He brought the Guang Ping Yang t'ai chi ch'uan to the United States.

History[edit]

Kuo Lien Ying's father was a silk merchant, and the family was independently wealthy. As a youngster, Kuo reportedly had no interest in an academic education, wanting only to learn the fighting arts.

In 1907, at the age of 12, Kuo started training in Northern Style Shaolin Kung-Fu, studying for five years with Master Li Lin, who was especially skilled in Chang Chuan (Long Fist). Kuo became proficient at this martial arts system, which was originally developed by Buddhist monks in China. His pushing hands training partner in Taiwan was Tchoung Ta-tchen.

At 23, Kuo became one of only four inner-door disciples of Wang Jiao-Yu, himself one of only two inner-door students of Yang Pan-hou. Yang Pan-hou was the son of the originator of what has become known as Guang Ping Yang t'ai chi ch'uan: Yang Lu-ch'an born Kuang-p'ing (Guangping) and known as the founder of Yang-style tai chi chuan. After completing "Chin to Toe" in 100 days Kuo was taught the Guang Ping Yang t'ai chi ch'uan from the 100-year old master Wang Jiao-Yu.

Kuo, at age 28, studied Xingyiquan for two years with Master Huang Gin Yin, a highly skilled student of Guo Yunshen, himself the teacher of Wang Xiangzhai, who was reputed to be the best Xingyiquan fighter of his time.[citation needed]

Kuo also studied Baguazhang with Chang Hsin Zhai and Chung Ting Hua.

Early career[edit]

Kuo Lien Ying reportedly was a bodyguard for a while on the gold caravans through China, protecting the caravans on horseback with his unrivaled rope-dart techniques.

He allegedly became a governor of a province in China, and later a general in the army of Chiang Kai Shek. In 1947, after the Communist takeover, he fled to Taiwan, became a congressman and opened up a martial arts school. Although he left his four wives and eight children in China when he fled Mao Zedong, Kuo wooed and married the 21 year old sister of one of his students, Ein Simmone Kuo.

Kuo was so confident of his fighting skills that in 1951 he issued a challenge to world boxing champion Joe Louis, to meet him for a fight. In 1972 Kuo claimed to the San Francisco Chronicle, "I could have thrown him." 1

Kuo Lien Ying in America[edit]

In 1965, he immigrated to the United States and settled in San Francisco's Chinatown, leaving his young wife behind in Taiwan. At the request of his first U.S. student, David Chin, Kuo began teaching a few students on the roof of a local hotel.

After less than a year, Kuo returned to Taiwan to bring Simmone Kuo to San Francisco. While he was in Taiwan, his students in San Francisco located an empty storefront at 11 Brenham Place, an alley which faced Portsmouth Square Park, which was unfortunately adjacent to a funeral parlor. The empty storefront was available due to the superstitions of the local residents who did not want to inhabit a place next to a mortuary. But according to one of his later students, Henry Look, Kuo often told him, "Don’t worry about dead people, worry about live ones." The students converted the storefront into a martial arts studio, with living quarters in the rear. Kuo named his new school, "Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Martial Arts Academy".

In 1967 Kuo and Simmone had a son, Chung Mei Kuo. Chung Mei was trained in the Shaolin Kung Fu and T'ai chi ch'uan styles at an early age, achieving Chin-to-Toe at 18 months.

Kuo was one of the major theorists of the Chin school, which offers the closest blend of the hard and soft styles. Chin stylists claim there is a 50-50 blend of the two because while you are yielding, you are most conscious of unyielding and that is the only way you can take advantage of all things.

T'ai chi ch'uan lineage tree with Yang-style focus[edit]

Note:

  • This lineage tree is not comprehensive, but depicts those considered the 'gate-keepers' & most recognised individuals in each generation of Yang-style.
  • Although many styles were passed down to respective descendants of the same family, the lineage focused on is that of the Yang style & not necessarily that of the family.


Key:
NEIJIA
Solid lines Direct teacher-student.
Dot lines Partial influence
/taught informally
/limited time.
TAIJIQUAN
Dash lines Individual(s) omitted.
Dash cross Branch continues.
CHEN-STYLE
Zhaobao-style
(陈长兴)
Chen Changxing
1771–1853
6th gen. Chen
Chen Old Frame
(杨露禅)
Yang Luchan
1799–1872
YANG-STYLE
Guang Ping Yang
Yangjia Michuan
(王蘭亭)
Wang Lanting
1840–?
2nd gen. Yang
(杨健侯)
Yang Jianhou
1839–1917
2nd gen. Yang
2nd gen. Yangjia Michuan
(杨班侯)
Yang Banhou
1837–1892
2nd gen. Yang
2nd gen.
Guang Ping Yang
Yang Small Frame
(武禹襄)
Wu Yuxiang
1812–1880
WU (HAO)-STYLE
Zhaobao He-style
(李瑞东)
Li Ruidong
1851–1917
Li-style
(杨少侯)
Yang Shaohou
1862–1930
3rd gen. Yang
Yang Small Frame
(吴全佑)
Wu Quanyou
1834–1902
1st gen. Wu
(王矯宇)
Wang Jaioyu
1836–1939
3rd gen.
Guang Ping Yang
(杨澄甫)
Yang Chengfu
1883–1936
3rd gen. Yang
Yang Big Frame
(田兆麟)
Tian Zhaolin
1891–1960
3rd gen. Yang
Qi Gechen
(吴鉴泉)
Wu Jianquan
1870–1942
2nd gen. Wu
WU-STYLE
108 Form
Kuo Lien Ying
1895–1984
4th gen.
Guang Ping Yang
(孙禄堂)
Sun Lutang
1861–1932
SUN-STYLE
(褚桂亭)
Chu Guiting
1892–1977
4th gen. Yang
Beijing form
(傅仲文)
Fu Zhongwen
1903–1994
4th gen. Yang
Beijing form
(董英杰)
Dong Yingjie
1891–1960
4th gen. Yang
(郑曼青)
Zheng Manqing
1902–1975
4th gen. Yang
Short (37) Form
(陈微明)
Chen Weiming
1881–1958
(杨振铎)
Yang Zhenduo
b.1926
4th gen. Yang
(杨振铭)
Yang Shouzhong
1910–1985
4th gen. Yang
(張欽霖)
Zhang Qinlin
1888–1967
3rd gen. Yangjia Michuan
(田英嘉)
Tian Yingjia
1931–2008
4th gen. Yang
Wudang-style
(吴公儀)
Wu Gongyi
1900–1970
3rd gen. Wu
(吴公藻)
Wu Gongzao
1903–1983
3rd gen. Wu
Taiwan
U.S.A
Robert W. Smith
1926–2011
(黃性賢)
Huang Xingxian
1910–1992
Benjamin Pang Jeng Lo
b.1927
William C. C. Chen
b.1935
Big Six
Tam Gibbs
Lou Kleinsmith
Ed Young
Mort Raphael
Maggie Newman
Stanley Israel
Little Six
Victor Chin
Y. Y. Chin
Jon Gaines
Natasha Gorky
Wolfe Lowenthal
Ken VanSickle
(杨军)
Yang Jun
b.1968
5th gen. Yang
Ip Tai Tak
1929–2004
5th gen. Yang
(王延年)
Wang Yennien
1914–2008
4th gen. Yangjia Michuan
(田邴原)
Tian Bingyuan
b.?
5th gen. Yang
Yao Guoqing
b.?
5th gen. Yang
CHEN-STYLE
YANG-STYLE
WU-STYLE
WU (HAO)-STYLE
SUN-STYLE

Portsmouth Square, Chinatown[edit]

Grandmaster Kuo Lien Ying, photo by Rubbo

Reportedly, one of the stories that Kuo told his students was about the time he was walking in a Chinatown alley late one evening and was set upon by a group of robbers. Kuo reached down and picked up a piece of metal lying on the ground and with his bare hands pounded the spike into the brick wall of the nearest building, and then hung his jacket on the spike. The would-be robbers fled.

Kuo Lien Ying was very flirtatious, with an eye for pretty young women, and developed a reputation for trying to seduce his female students. He was well known for eating several cloves of raw garlic every morning, and he was also very fond of Gao Liang, a strong Chinese liquor.

With an uncanny sixth sense, Kuo knew when his students would sleep in, missing the 5 a.m. practice session, and he would call them up, shouting in Chinese into the telephone, "Lela, lela, t'ai chi, t'ai chi!" ("Practice, practice, t'ai chi, t'ai chi!")

Kuo Lien Ying was among the first Chinese martial arts masters in America to teach Asian fighting arts to American students, and was often admonished by other Chinese teachers to not teach to Westerners.[citation needed]

In 1975 Sam Peckinpah filmed part of The Killer Elite in Portsmouth Square, and hired Kuo Lien Ying and many of his students for the scenes of a martial arts school in San Francisco.

Kuo and his students gave many demonstrations of T'ai chi ch'uan and Shaolin Kung-Fu at many locations, including schools and banks.

In 1983, Kuo returned to Mongolia, and died in 1984.

Followers[edit]

Simmone Kuo, Kuo's widow, continues to teach at the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Martial Arts Academy in Chinatown as well as at San Francisco State University.

Bill Douglas, founder of World Tai Chi and Qigong Day, carries on the form under the name Kuang Ping Yang Tai Chi Chuan, as passed down from Kuo Lien Ying to Gilles Messenger to Colin Berg, Anne Beier and Jennifer Booth, Bill's teacher.

Guang Ping Yang Tai Chi Association[edit]

The Guang Ping Yang Tai Chi Association was formed in 1997 to honor the memory of Sifu Kuo Lien Ying and in commemoration of his unselfish sharing of his many skills. The mission of the Association is to promote, perpetuate, develop interest in, and preserve the quality of Guang Ping Yang style t'ai chi ch'uan throughout the world, and to provide support for research and education in Guang Ping Yang t'ai chi ch'uan.

In Kuo's Honor[edit]

Every June, Kuo's direct students hold a memorial in Portsmouth Square, Chinatown, to pay respects to their late teacher, for the invaluable teachings he passed down to them, and for bringing the Guang Ping Yang t'ai chi ch'uan style to the United States of America.

Books[edit]

References[edit]

[3] [In matters of taste there is no dispute]

External links[edit]