Kure Beach, North Carolina

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Kure Beach, North Carolina
Town
Location of Kure Beach, North Carolina
Location of Kure Beach, North Carolina
Coordinates: 33°59′52″N 77°54′29″W / 33.99778°N 77.90806°W / 33.99778; -77.90806Coordinates: 33°59′52″N 77°54′29″W / 33.99778°N 77.90806°W / 33.99778; -77.90806
Country United States
State North Carolina
County New Hanover
Area
 • Total 0.8 sq mi (2.0 km2)
 • Land 0.8 sq mi (2.0 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2009)
 • Total 2,494
 • Density 1,931.6/sq mi (745.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 28449
Area code(s) 910
FIPS code 37-36220[1]
GNIS feature ID 1021071[2]
Coordinates and area from USGS[3]

Kure Beach (ˈkjʊərɪ KYUR-ee)[4] is a town in New Hanover County, North Carolina about 15 miles south of Wilmington. It is part of the Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,507 at the 2000 census. It is found on Pleasure Island directly south of the Wilmington Beach annex of Carolina Beach and just north of Fort Fisher.

The original pronunciation of Kure is based on the name of the founder, Hans Andersen Kure, of Danish extraction. Hans Kure's name is pronounced "CURE-ee." Tourist call this beach how "curry" sounds. Natives, however, still pronounce it "Cure-ee."

WWII bombardment[edit]

On the night of July 24/25, 1943, a German U-boat fired at least three shells to attack the "Ethyl-Dow Chemical Company" plant at "Kure's Beach" (post-war: Kure Beach), but instead hit the Cape Fear River. The plant was the only one on the East Coast producing bromine from seawater for use in aviation gasoline [5]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,507 people, 723 households, and 495 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,931.6 people per square mile (746.0/km²). There were 1,560 housing units at an average density of 1,999.6 per square mile (772.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.74% White, 0.07% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population.

There were 723 households out of which 15.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.48.

In the town the population was spread out with 12.0% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 42.3% from 45 to 64, and 18.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $47,143, and the median income for a family was $55,875. Males had a median income of $32,708 versus $30,735 for females. The per capita income for the town was $26,759. About 4.1% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.

New Hanover County School System[edit]

In this area of North Carolina elementary school children will be zoned for Carolina Beach Elementary School, middle school children zoned for Murray Middle School, and zoned for high school, Ashley High School or an early college high school including:

Isaac Bear Early College High School (UNCW)

Wilmington Early College High School (CFCC)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ Ben Steelman (March 6, 2009). "Why do they call it Kure Beach?". Star News Online. Retrieved 29 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Jones, Jr, Wilbur D. The Journey Continues: The World War II Home Front. p. xxiv,64. 

External links[edit]