Kurt Schlosser Saxon Mountaineers' Choir

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kurt Schlosser Saxon Mountaineers' Choir
Sächsischer Bergsteigerchor "Kurt Schlosser" Dresden
Origin Dresden / Germany
Founding 1927
Genre male voice choir
Members 140 (TTBB)
Music Director Axel Langmann
Website www.bergsteigerchor.de

The Kurt Schlosser Saxon Mountaineers' Choir (German: Sächsische Bergsteigerchor "Kurt Schlosser" Dresden) was founded in 1927. The choir consists of 140 male voices. Amongst its repertoire are classical and contemporary works as well as traditional mountaineering, hiking, regional and folk songs.

History[edit]

The choir was founded originally as the singing section of a tourist association known as "Die Naturfreunde - Vereinigte Kletterabteilungen Sachsen/VKA" in Dresden's Keglerheim. Its first director was Kurt Lauterbach and its first concert took place on 14 February 1928.

The Saxon Mountaineers' Choir has borne the name Kurt Schlosser since 10 September 1949. Schlosser, born in 1900, was himself a member of the VKA. During the Nazi era the choir was banned and many choir members performed illegally. Several climbers and members of the choir organised the Red Climbers under the direction of Kurt Schlosser in various Dresden factories as part of anti-Faschist resistance.

The Red Climbers (roten Bergsteiger) established themselves in Saxon Switzerland in a rock cave near the rock of the Satanskopf as a secret office and hiding place.

After being arrested on 3 December 1943 Kurt Schlosser was sentenced to the guillotine on 16 August 1944. Other climbers and choir members also became victims of Nazi justice.

With the demise of Nazism in 1945 the choir renewed its musical activities.

Videos[edit]

  • „75 Jahre Sächsischer Bergsteigerchor „Kurt Schlosser“ Dresden“
  • „Zauberhaftes Ost-Erzgebirge - Unterwegs zwischen Weesenstein und Zinnwald“
  • „Bergheimat Oberlausitz - Eine Wanderung mit dem Bergsteigerchor ‚Kurt Schlosser‘“
  • „Zum Gipfel empor - Faszinierendes Elbsandsteingebirge“

Sources[edit]