Kyi Soe Tun

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Kyi Soe Tun
ကြည်စိုးထွန်း
Born (1945-12-09) 9 December 1945 (age 69)
Yangon, British Burma
Years active 1977 – present
Parents U Tun and Daw Hla
Awards Doe (Best Director, 1989)
Thu Kyun Ma Khan Bi (Best Director, 1997)
Upstream (Best Director, 2002)
Hexagon (Best Director, 2006)
Hexagon (Best Screenplay, 2006)

Kyi Soe Tun (Burmese: ကြည်စိုးထွန်း, pronounced: [tɕì só tʰʊ́ɴ]; born 9 December 1945) is a five-time Myanmar Academy Award winning film director, producer and screenwriter of Burmese cinema. He served as the chairman of the Myanmar Motion Picture Organization.[citation needed]

Biography[edit]

Kyi Soe Tun is the son of Daw Hla and her husband U Tun in Yangon. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Yangon University. He began his film career in 1977, and first served as director in 1980 in the film Chan Myay Pa Say.He won five national awards Academy.

Filmography[edit]

Kyi Soe Tun's films include:

  • Sone Yay or Downstream (1990)
  • Upstream, about a boy who is raised in a monastery after he is abandoned by his parents. Searching for them, he discovers Buddhism.
  • Thu Kyun Ma Khan Bi or Never Shall We Be Enslaved (1997) is about the last king of Burma, Thibaw Min. British and French colonialists interfere in the internal affairs of the Burmese kingdom which leads to its destruction and a subsequent revolt to regain independence. (See also History of Myanmar.)
  • Sacrificial Heart (2004) is a drama set in the Pagan Kingdom. In 1074, King Anawrahta sent his son, General Kyansittha to help the Mon people overcome invaders. Kyanzittha fell in love with the Mon king's wife, thus beginning a triangular love affair in the midst of war.
  • True Love (2005) is about a romance between a Japanese man and a young Burmese woman.
  • Hexagon (2006) is a comedy about six pregnant women who are very optimistic about the future of their children to be.

References[edit]

  • Rithdee, Kong. August 11, 2006. "Cultural Exchange," Realtime, page 1, The Bangkok Post (print edition).

External links[edit]