Lívia Járóka

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Lívia Járóka

Lívia Járóka (born 6 October 1974 in Tata) is a Hungarian politician of part Romani ethnicity. She is a Member of the European Parliament, elected as part of the Fidesz list in 2004. Járóka was the second Romani (but the first Romani woman) ever elected to the European Parliament; the first was Juan de Dios Ramirez Heredia from Spain, who served from 1994 to 1999.

Járóka grew up in Sopron, a town near Hungary's western border with Austria. Her father is ethnically Roma, her mother Hungarian. After getting an MA in sociology from the Central European University Warsaw campus on a scholarship from the Soros-funded Open Society Institute she went on to study anthropology in Britain, focusing on Romani issues and culture. In August 2003 she had a daughter and a son in 2007. In 2012 she finished her PhD in Social Anthropology at the University College of London.

Memberships[edit]

She is Chair of the Working Group of the European People's Party on Roma Inclusion and Vice-Chair of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality. She is also a member of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and the Delegation for Relations with India. She is a substitute member of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, as well as the Committee on Human Rights.

Other memberships[edit]

Research activities[edit]

  • September 2000-April 2002: Ethnographic field resech on assimilation tendencies of Roma in Hungary
  • May 1998-May 2001: Sociological reserch among Roma students of Gandhi Gimnazium, Hungary

Awards[edit]

  • Elected Young Global Leader in 2006 by the Forum of Young Global Leaders and the World Economic Forum
  • 2006 and 2013 Member of the European Parliament of the Year (MEP) award in the category of Justice and Fundamental Rights
  • Awarded the Romanian Foreign Ministry's Exellency Award for the Social Integration of Minorities in 2010
  • Awarded the Presidential Order of Merit of Hungary for her outstanding work during the Hungaria Presidency of the EU in 2011
  • Won the St. Adalbert Award of the Hungarian Association of Christian Intellectuals in 2011
  • Award of the "Fundación Secretariado Gitano" in 2012


External links[edit]