L.D. Clawson

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L.D. Clawson
Born Lawrence Dallin Clawson
ca. 1886
Salt Lake City, Utah
Died July 18, 1937(1937-07-18)
Englewood, New Jersey
Other names Dal Clawson
Title A.S.C. Founding Member

L. Dal Clawson had spent about 17 years behind a movie camera when he helped found the A.S.C., but nothing is known about his earliest years in the business. He was born around 1886 in Salt Lake City, Utah, and his first known feature credits as a cinematographer are for director Lois Weber at Bosworth, Inc., and Universal in 1914-15. This was after graduating from the University of Utah as a mechanical engineer. He also worked for the American Film Company and Ince-Triangle-KayBee, where photographic superintendent and future director Irvin Willat would remember Clawson as “sort of like a news cameraman” who was not especially noted for his lighting style. He also worked around the world, even being decorated by the King of Siam for his work. His book on this adventure was entitled "How I Shot the King of Siam".

By the early 1920s, Clawson was chief cinematographer for popular star Anita Stewart at Louis B. Mayer Productions, but later in the decade, he often worked as a second cameraman. He was lead cinematographer on the early talkie Syncopation, but his few remaining published credits are for expedition films such as Hunting Tigers in India (1929) and low-budget East Coast productions such as The Black King and The Horror (both 1932).

Clawson died in Englewood, New Jersey, on July 18, 1937. His obituary states a cause of intestinal malady at the local hospital; it further reports that it happened within the hour of his mother. Clawson's widow received the telegram a half-hour after the widow had sent his mother a telegram of his death. No information was provided of the death of his mother. The obituary reported that his ashes would be buried in Salt Lake City.

His obituary was published in the New York Times on July 20, 1937.

Cinematographer[edit]

  • The Dead March (1937) (original material)
  • The Horror (1932)
  • The Black King (1932)
  • The Love Kiss (1930)
  • Love at First Sight (1929)
  • Black and Tan (1929)
  • Hunting Tigers in India (1929)
  • Syncopation (1929)
  • The Slaver (1927)
  • What Price Love? (1927)
  • Miami (1924)
  • The Lone Wolf (1924)
  • Another Scandal (1924)
  • The Marriage Chance (1922)
  • The World's a Stage (1922)
  • Rose o' the Sea (1922)
  • The Woman He Married (1922)
  • What Do Men Want? (1921)
  • The Oath (1921/I)
  • The Corsican Brothers (1920)
  • Eve in Exile (1919)
  • Bonds of Honor (1919)
  • Her Kingdom of Dreams (1919)
  • Back to God's Country (1919)
  • Forbidden (1919)
  • Mary Regan (1919)
  • The Courageous Coward (1919)
  • A Heart in Pawn (1919)
  • A Midnight Romance (1919)
  • When a Girl Loves (1919)
  • The Temple of Dusk (1918)
  • For Husbands Only (1918)
  • The Red, Red Heart (1918)
  • The Pride of New York (1917)
  • The Conqueror (1917)
  • Betrayed (1917)
  • The Innocent Sinner (1917)
  • The Silent Lie (1917)
  • One Touch of Sin (1917)
  • The Weaker Sex (1917)
  • This Is the Life (1917)
  • The Female of the Species (1916)
  • The Love Thief (1916)
  • The Honorable Algy (1916)
  • Somewhere in France (1916)
  • The Vagabond Prince (1916)
  • Honor Thy Name (1916)
  • The Phantom (1916)
  • Civilization (1916)
  • The Dumb Girl of Portici (1916)
  • The Call of the Cumberlands (1916)
  • The Yankee Girl (1915)
  • Scandal (1915)
  • The Rosary (1915)
  • Captain Courtesy (1915)
  • Sunshine Molly (1915)
  • Hypocrites (1915)
  • It's No Laughing Matter (1915)
  • The Career of Waterloo Peterson (1914)
  • The Merchant of Venice (1914)

External links[edit]