L. Scott Pendlebury

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L. Scott Pendlebury
Born Laurence Scott Pendlebury
(1914-04-21)21 April 1914
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Died May 1986 (aged 71–72)
Education National Gallery of Victoria Art School
Notable work(s) The Chicory Kiln, Phillip Island, Constitution Dock, Hobart, Old Farmhouse, Road to Whistlewood
Spouse(s) Eleanor Constance "Nornie" Gude
Awards
  • Dunlop Art Contest (1953)
  • Wynne Prize (1956, 1957, 1960, 1968)

L. Scott Pendlebury or Laurence Scott Pendlebury (21 April 1914 – May 1986) was an Australian landscape and portrait artist and teacher. He married fellow artist Eleanor Constance "Nornie" Gude (8 December 1915 – 24 January 2002) in January 1943 and they were the parents of Anne Lorraine Pendlebury (born 21 August 1946), a stage, film and TV actress; and Andrew Scott Pendlebury (born 1952) a guitarist-songwriter. Pendlebury won the Wynne Prize four times for his landscape paintings with The Chicory Kiln, Phillip Island (1956), Constitution Dock, Hobart (1957), Old Farmhouse (1960, shared with John Perceval's Dairy Farm, Victoria) and Road to Whistlewood (1968). He was a finalist in the Archibald Prize twenty-four times, including Nornie Gude (Artist) (1944) and Anne and Drew Pendlebury (actress and musician respectively) (1979). His work was presented in the state galleries of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. Pendlebury worked at Swinburne Technical College as an instructor from 1946 to 1963 and then as head of the art school until his retirement in 1974. He died in May 1986, aged 72.

Biography[edit]

Laurence Scott Pendlebury was born on 21 April 1914 in Melbourne.[1][2] His father was Thomas Pendlebury (ca. 1872 – 20 October 1945), who worked at the Government Printing Office, and his mother was Jessie (died 25 January 1935); his older siblings were Thelma, Kath, Lyla/Leila and Thomas junior.[3][4] Pendlebury attended the National Gallery of Victoria Art School from 1932 to 1938.[1] While there, in 1936, he met fellow artist, Eleanor Constance "Nornie" Gude (8 December 1915 – 24 January 2002), daughter of Ballarat-based artist, Walter Gude.[5] On 28 January 1943 Pendlebury and Gude married.[6]

During World War II, on 26 April 1945, Pendlebury enlisted in the Australian Army and was discharged as a Sergeant on 21 December that year.[2] Pendlebury and Gude's children are Anne Lorraine Pendlebury (born 21 August 1946),[7] who became a stage, film and TV actress; and Andrew Scott Pendlebury (born 1952) a guitarist-songwriter.[1][5]

In May 1953 Pendlebury won the Dunlop Art Contest, with a first prize of 300, ahead of Arthur Boyd, for his oil painting, Late Afternoon – Rhyll.[8][9] It was Pendlebury's fourth award in the competition, he finished third in 1952, fourth in 1951,[8] and fourth previously in 1950 – the competition's inaugural year.[10] The contest was sponsored by the Dunlop Rubber Company of Australia (later became Ansell) and aimed to "foster contemporary Australian art on aesthetic merits alone".[11][12] One of the 1953 judges, Arnold Shore, reported in The Argus, that Pendlebury's work was a "sober, well-considered landscape" and it won against about 900 entries from throughout Australia.[9] When exhibited in Adelaide, The Advertiser's Elizabeth Young preferred the watercolour entrants and felt Late Afternoon – Rhyll "completely lacks subtlety and with a slick harshness apes to a certain extent the contemporary approach, while having nothing of its essential spirit".[13]

Pendlebury has won the Wynne Prize for a landscape painting, four times: The chicory kiln, Phillip Island (1956), Constitution Dock, Hobart (1957), Old farmhouse (1960, tied with John Perceval's Dairy Farm, Victoria), and Road to Whistlewood (1968).[14] He qualified as a finalist, twenty-four times, in the Archibald Prize by painting portraits of notable Australians, including related subjects: Nornie Gude (Artist) (1944),[15] Walter Gude (1945),[16] Nornie Gude (1949),[17] Self Portrait (1951),[18] Nornie Gude (1959),[19] Anne as "Irena" in the Three Sisters (1968),[20] Nornie Gude (1978),[21] and Anne and Drew Pendlebury (actress and musician respectively) (1979).[22]

His art work was presented in the state galleries of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria.[1] Pendlebury worked at Swinburne Technical College as an instructor from 1946 to 1963 and then as head of the art school until his retirement in 1974.[1] L. Scott Pendlebury died in May 1986, aged 72.

Art prizes[edit]

Dunlop Art Contest
1950 . – Fourth[9]
1951 . – Fourth[9]
1952 . – Third[9]
1953 Late Afternoon – Rhyll – First[9]
1954
1955

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Laurence Scott Pendlebury (1914–1986)". Kew Gallery. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Pendlebury, Laurence Scott". World War Two Nominal Roll. Australian Army (Commonwealth of Australia). Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "Family Notices. Deaths (continued from Page 2.)". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). 22 October 1945. p. 17. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "Family Notices. Deaths". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). 28 January 1935. p. 1. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Eleanor Gude :: Biography". Design and Art Australia Online. 19 October 2011. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Family Notices. Marriages". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). 28 January 1943. p. 2. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "Family Notices – Births". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne: National Library of Australia). 29 August 1946. p. 2. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Award To Vic. Artist.". The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 12 May 1953. p. 3. Retrieved 15 November 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Shore, Arnold (12 May 1953). "This Oil Won £300.". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). p. 4. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Dunlop Award Winners". Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 - 1954) (Launceston, Tas.: National Library of Australia). 7 June 1950. p. 8. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "Dunlop Australian Art Contest : Australian Gallery File". Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  12. ^ Mead, Stephen F. "Ludmilla Meilerts". Metropolis Gallery. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  13. ^ Young, Elizabeth (6 August 1953). "Watercolors Stronger Than Oils". The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). p. 5. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "Wynne Prize winners (1897 - )". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 29 June 2010. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  15. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1944". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  16. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1945". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  17. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1949". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  18. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1951". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  19. ^ a b c "Archibald Prize Finalists 1959". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  20. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1968". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  21. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1978". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  22. ^ a b "Archibald Prize Finalists 1979". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  23. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1946". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  24. ^ Jones, Barry O. (1988). "Osborne, William Alexander (1873–1967)". Australian Dictionary of Biography 11. Melbourne University Press. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. Retrieved 24 November 2012. 
  25. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1947". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  26. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1948". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  27. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1950". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  28. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1952". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  29. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1953". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  30. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1954". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  31. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1956". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  32. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1957". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  33. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1958". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  34. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1960". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  35. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1961". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  36. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1962". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  37. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1973". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  38. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1974". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  39. ^ "Archibald Prize Finalists 1980". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  40. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1950". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  41. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1951". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  42. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1953". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  43. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1954". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  44. ^ a b "Wynne Prize Finalists 1956". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  45. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1957". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  46. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1959". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  47. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1960". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  48. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1961". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 17 November 2012. 
  49. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1962". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  50. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1968". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  51. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1969". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  52. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1970". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 
  53. ^ "Wynne Prize Finalists 1972". Art Gallery of New South Wales. Retrieved 18 November 2012. 

External links[edit]

  • "His £300 picture". The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 1 August 1953. p. 57. Retrieved 16 November 2012.  Photo of L. Scott Pendlebury and Nornie Gude viewing Pendlebury's Late Afternoon – Rhyll, winner of the 1953 Dunlop Art Contest.