LEN European Aquatics Championships

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European Aquatics Championships
Status active
Genre sporting event
Date(s) mid-year
Frequency biannual
Country varying
Inaugurated 1926 (1926)

The European Aquatics Championships is the continental Aquatics championship for Europe, which is organized by LEN—the governing body for aquatics in Europe. The Championships are currently held every two years (in even years); and since 1999, they have included 4 aquatics disciplines: swimming (long course/50m pool), diving, synchronized swimming and open water swimming. Prior to 1999, the championships also included water polo, which beginning in 1999 LEN split-off into a separate championships.

The Championships are generally held over a two-week period in mid-to-late Summer; however, in the most recent Summer Olympics years (2004, 2008 and 2012), the Championships were moved to the Spring to be moved away from the Olympics.

The swimming portion of these championships is considered one of the premier swimming competitions in the world.

Note: LEN also conducts an annual short-course (25m) swimming championship, which is a separate and different event (typically held in early December).

Championships[edit]

Historically, the Championships were first held in 1926, and included water polo prior to 1999 when the discipline was moved to the European Water Polo Championship. From 1973-1999 Europeans were held in years without a Summer Olympics or World Championships, save 1979 (1973 being the inception year of the World Championships; and 1999 being the last year before Worlds moved from even-years between Summer Olympics to every-odd year beginning in 2001). Women were first allowed to participate at the second Championships in 1927[1]

Year Host city Country Date Winner of the Medal Table Second in the Medal Table Third in the Medal Table
1926 Budapest  Hungary 18–22 August  Germany  Sweden  Hungary
1927 Bologna  Italy 31 August–4 September  Germany  Sweden  Netherlands
1931 Paris  France 23–30 August  Hungary  Germany  Netherlands
1934 Magdeburg  Germany 12–19 August  Germany  Netherlands  Hungary
1938 London  United Kingdom 6–13 August Nazi Germany Germany  Denmark  Netherlands
1947 Monte Carlo  Monaco 10–14 September  France  Denmark  Hungary
1950 Vienna  Austria 20–27 August  France  Netherlands  West Germany
1954 Turin  Italy 31 August–5 September  Hungary  Soviet Union  East Germany
1958 Budapest  Hungary 31 August–6 September  Soviet Union  Great Britain  Netherlands
1962 Leipzig  East Germany 18–25 August  Netherlands  East Germany  Soviet Union
1966 Utrecht  Netherlands 20–27 August  Soviet Union  East Germany  Netherlands
1970 Barcelona  Spain 5–13 September  East Germany  Soviet Union  West Germany
1974 Amsterdam
Vienna
 Netherlands
 Austria
18–25 August  East Germany  West Germany  Great Britain
1977 Jönköping  Sweden 14–21 August  East Germany  Soviet Union  West Germany
1981 Split  Yugoslavia 4–12 September  East Germany  Soviet Union  Great Britain
1983 Rome  Italy 22–27 August  East Germany  Soviet Union  West Germany
1985 Oslo
Sofia
 Norway
 Bulgaria
4–11 August  East Germany  Soviet Union  West Germany
1987 Strasbourg  France 16–23 August  East Germany  Soviet Union  West Germany
1989 Bonn  West Germany 15–20 August  East Germany  Soviet Union  France
1991 Athens  Greece 18–25 August  Soviet Union  Germany  Hungary
1993 Sheffield  United Kingdom 3–8 August  Germany  Russia  Hungary
1995 Vienna  Austria 22–27 August  Russia  Germany  Hungary
1997 Seville  Spain 19–24 August  Russia  Germany  Hungary
1999 Istanbul  Turkey 26 July–1 August  Germany  Russia  Netherlands
2000 Helsinki  Finland 3–9 July  Russia  Germany  Italy
2002 Berlin  Germany 29 July–4 August  Germany  Russia  Italy
2004 Madrid  Spain 5–16 May  Ukraine  Russia  Italy
2006 Budapest  Hungary 26 July–6 August  Russia  Germany  France
2008 Eindhoven  Netherlands 13–24 March  Russia  Italy  France
2010 Budapest  Hungary 4–15 August  Russia  Germany  France
2012 Debrecen
Eindhoven
 Hungary
 Netherlands
15–27 May  Hungary  Germany  Italy
2014 Berlin  Germany 13–24 August  Great Britain  Russia  Italy
2016 London  United Kingdom 9–22 May TBD
2018 Glasgow  United Kingdom TBD TBD

Medal table (1926–2014)[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Germany 154 147 110 411
2  Russia 145 89 59 293
3  East Germany 143 116 68 327
4  Soviet Union 97 87 80 264
5  Hungary 96 87 63 246
6  France 77 83 70 230
7  Italy 76 86 126 288
8  Netherlands 67 83 78 228
9  Great Britain 64 71 97 232
10  Sweden 54 74 63 191
11  West Germany 41 33 49 123
12  Ukraine 39 43 56 138
13  Spain 30 45 39 114
14  Denmark 27 13 29 69
15  Poland 18 14 20 52
16  Austria 12 16 17 45
17  Finland 12 6 9 27
18  Romania 8 23 32 63
19  Norway 6 6 5 17
20  Belarus 5 8 15 28
21  Belgium 5 5 14 24
22  Ireland 4 6 0 10
23  Serbia 4 0 0 4
24  Slovakia 3 10 2 15
25  Greece 3 6 17 26
26   Switzerland 3 5 15 19
27  Czech Republic 3 1 15 19
28  Yugoslavia 2 14 13 29
29  Croatia 2 7 6 15
30  Czechoslovakia 2 4 11 17
31  Slovenia 2 4 8 14
32  Bulgaria 2 3 9 14
33  Lithuania 1 3 4 8
34  Israel 1 2 8 11
35  Faroe Islands 0 3 0 3
36  Estonia 0 1 0 1
 Portugal 0 1 0 1
 Serbia and Montenegro 0 1 0 1
39  Turkey 0 0 1 1
Total 1208 1206 1208 3622

Note: The table includes medals won in swimming (since 1926), diving (since 1926), synchronized swimming (since 1974), open water swimming (since 1993) and water polo since 1926 until and including 1997 when the discipline was part of the event. From 1999 the water polo event was separated and got its own independent tournament as European Water Polo Championship.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ European Championships, 17 apr 2011

External links[edit]