LGBT Equality Caucus

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LGBT Equality Caucus Members at the Kick-off Press Conference from left to right: Niki Tsongas (D–MA), José Serrano (D–NY), Xavier Becerra (D–CA), Hilda Solis (D–CA), Jerry Nadler (D–NY), Barbara Lee (D–CA), Tammy Baldwin (D–WI), Lois Capps (D–CA), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R–FL), Linda Sánchez (D–CA), Mike Honda (D–CA), James McGovern (D–MA), Barney Frank (D–MA), Chris Shays (R–CT).

The LGBT Equality Caucus formation was announced on June 4, 2008, by openly gay representatives Tammy Baldwin and Barney Frank.[1][2] The caucus currently has 112 members (111 Democrats and 1 Republican) in the 113th United States Congress, and previously had 104 members (101 Democrats and 3 Republicans) in the 112th Congress[3] and 91 members (90 Democrats and 1 Republican) during the 111th Congress.[4] The caucus is co-chaired by the United States House of Representatives' seven openly LGB members: Representatives Jared Polis, David Cicilline, Sean Patrick Maloney, Mike Michaud, Kyrsten Sinema, Mark Pocan, and Mark Takano. Brad Jacklin serves as Executive Director.

Mission[edit]

The mission of the caucus is to work for LGBT rights, the repeal of laws discriminatory against LGBT persons, the elimination of hate-motivated violence, and improved health and well-being for all persons, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.[5] The caucus serves as a resource for Members of Congress, their staffs, and the public on LGBT issues.[5] Unlike the Congressional Black Caucus, famous for admitting only black members, the LGBT Equality Caucus admits any member who is willing to advance LGBT rights, regardless of their sexual identity or orientation.

Membership[edit]

List of Caucus members in the 113th Congress:

Co-Chairs[edit]

Vice Chairs[edit]

Members[edit]

Former members[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "House Members Form LGBT Equality Caucus: Goal is Equality for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Americans" (Press release). LGBT Equality Caucus. June 4, 2008. Retrieved January 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ "U.S. House Members Form First Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus", The Advocate, February 5, 2008, retrieved 2010-04-07 
  3. ^ "LGBT Equality Caucus Membership List". Archived from the original on January 5, 2013. Retrieved January 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ "LGBT Equality Caucus Membership List". Archived from the original on 2011-01-19. Retrieved 2011-01-19. 
  5. ^ a b "Mission". LGBT Equality Caucus. Retrieved January 5, 2013. 

External links[edit]