LNER Thompson Class O1

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LNER Thompson Class O1
Killamarsh Central station geograph-2465092-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
No. 63786, rebuilt from ex-GC Class O4 No. 6515 at Killamarsh 1963
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer Edward Thompson
Builder LNER
Build date 1944
Total produced 58
Specifications
Configuration 2-8-0
UIC classification 1'D
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 4 ft 8 in (1.42 m)
Locomotive weight 73.3 long tons (74.5 t)
Fuel type Coal
Boiler pressure 225 psi (1.55 MPa)
Cylinders Two, outside
Cylinder size 20 in × 26 in (510 mm × 660 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 35,520 lbf (158.0 kN)
Career
Power class 8F
Axle load class Route Availability 6
Disposition All scrapped

The London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) Thompson Class O1 was a class of 2-8-0 steam locomotive designed by Edward Thompson for freight work. None has survived to preservation.

Construction[edit]

Because of wartime restrictions on new-build locomotives, they were rebuilds of LNER Class O4 "ROD" 2-8-0s built before and during World War I, although most of the locomotive was replaced during this rebuild. The first LNER rebuild took place in February 1944, and 58 locomotives were rebuilt to class O1 in total, with the last being locomotive 63856 in October 1949 during the early British Railways era, after which the programme was halted.[1] The main modification to the original Great Central Railway Class 8K design was the incorporation of a standard LNER 100A boiler, Walschaerts valve gear and new cylinders.

British Railways[edit]

The locomotives passed to British Railways (BR) Eastern and North Eastern Regions on 1 January 1948 and were given BR running numbers in the range 63570-63920. However, this range included many unrebuilt O4s.[2]

Preservation[edit]

None of the Thompson O1s have been secured for preservation.

Models[edit]

Hornby make models of the O1s in OO gauge.

63760 at Gorton loco shed on 8 November 1958. This O1 is unusual in being fitted with two air pumps just in front of the cab for operation of heavy iron ore trains from Tyne Dock to Consett steel works.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rowledge, J.W.P. (1977). Heavy Goods Engines of the War Department, Volume 1, ROD 2-8-0. Springmead Railway Books. pp. 66–68. 
  2. ^ Ian Allan (Summer 1961). ABC of British Railways Locomotives, part 4. pp. 36–37. 

External links[edit]