LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers

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LSU Fighting Tigers and
Lady Tigers
Logo
University Louisiana State University
Conference Southeastern Conference
NCAA Division I / FBS
Athletic director Joe Alleva
Location Baton Rouge, LA
Varsity teams 21
Football stadium Tiger Stadium
Basketball arena Pete Maravich Assembly Center
Baseball stadium Alex Box Stadium/Skip Bertman Field
Other arenas Bernie Moore Track Stadium
Carl Maddox Field House
LSU Natatorium
LSU Soccer Stadium
The University Club
Tiger Park
W.T. “Dub” Robinson Stadium
Mascot Mike the Tiger
Nickname Fighting Tigers, Tigers, Lady Tigers, Bayou Bengals
Fight song Fight for LSU
Colors
     Purple       Gold
Website www.lsusports.net
LSU Athletics Administration Building

The LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers are the athletic teams of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. They participate in the NCAA's Division I, in the Southeastern Conference. LSU fields teams in 21 varsity sports (9 men's, 12 women's). The 9 men's teams play baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, swimming & diving, tennis, indoor track & field, and outdoor track & field. The 11 women's teams play basketball, cross country, golf, gymnastics, sand volleyball, soccer, softball, swimming & diving, tennis, indoor track & field, outdoor track & field and volleyball. LSU athletics has many traditions associated with its sports programs. Its official team nickname is the Fighting Tigers, Tigers or Lady Tigers. The nickname was first coined in 1896 after an undefeated football season. The nickname is a throwback to the Civil War fame of a New Orleans infantry company, the "Tiger Rifles". They fought so fiercely in General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia that they, and eventually all other Louisiana troops, became known as "Louisiana Tigers". In 1955, the LSU "fourth-quarter club" added the word "Fighting" to the nickname thus becoming "Fighting Tigers". The school's mascot is Mike the Tiger and the official school colors are royal purple and old gold. Keeping with the French/Cajun character of South Louisiana, LSU support can be seen by its distinctive spelling of "Go Tigers" as "Geaux Tigers".

Based on winning percentage, the university's athletics program is consistently one of the best in the nation. LSU has also won 46 team national championships. Placing them tied for 5th all-time in total national championships. Former important rivals in football include one of the longest running college football rivalries with the Ole Miss Rebels and the Tulane Green Wave. More current rivalries include the Alabama Crimson Tide, the Arkansas Razorbacks, the Florida Gators and the Texas A&M Aggies.

National championships[edit]

LSU has won 46 overall men's and women's team national championships for 5th all-time in total national championships. 42 are recognized by the NCAA, placing them 7th all-time in total NCAA national championships with the NCAA not recognizing college football national championships at the Division I-FBS level.[1]

LSU NCAA National Championships
Year Sport

1933 Men's outdoor track and field
1940 Men's Golf
1942 Men's Golf
1947 Men's Golf
1949 Men's Boxing
1955 Men's Golf
1987 Women's indoor track and field
1987 Women's outdoor track and field
1988 Women's outdoor track and field
1989 Men's outdoor track and field
1989 Women's indoor track and field
1989 Women's outdoor track and field
1990 Men's outdoor track and field
1990 Women's outdoor track and field
1991 Baseball
1991 Women's indoor track and field
1991 Women's outdoor track and field
1992 Women's outdoor track and field
1993 Baseball
1993 Women's indoor track and field
1993 Women's outdoor track and field
1994 Women's indoor track and field
1994 Women's outdoor track and field
1995 Women's indoor track and field
1995 Women's outdoor track and field
1996 Baseball
1996 Women's indoor track and field
1996 Women's outdoor track and field
1997 Baseball
1997 Women's indoor track and field
1997 Women's outdoor track and field
2000 Baseball
2000 Women's outdoor track and field
2001 Men's indoor track and field
2002 Men's outdoor track and field
2002 Women's indoor track and field
2003 Women's indoor track and field
2003 Women's outdoor track and field
2004 Men's indoor track and field
2004 Women's indoor track and field
2008 Women's outdoor track and field
2009 Baseball
2012 Women's outdoor track and field (Vacated)
LSU National Championships
Year Sport

1935 Men's basketball (American Legion Bowl NC game)
1958 Football (AP, Coaches)^
2003 Football (Bowl Championship Series)^^
2007 Football (AP, Bowl Championship Series)^^

^ The NCAA does not award a national championship in Division I-FBS football. Instead, polls were used to determine national champions. In this case, the AP Poll and the Coaches Poll, the two biggest selectors at the time, awarded LSU the national championship. This championship is not recognized by the NCAA because the championship was won without participating in an NCAA recognized event or tournament.

^^ The NCAA does not award a national championship in Division I-FBS football. In 1998 major Division I-FBS conferences came together to create the Bowl Championship Series in an effort to establish a more legitimate national champion. LSU won the 2003 BCS national championship and the 2007 BCS national championship. These championships are not recognized by the NCAA because the championships were won without participating in an NCAA recognized event or tournament.

NACDA Directors' Cup[edit]

The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) ranks athletic departments on an annual basis. Each institution is awarded points in a pre-determined number of sports for men and women. The overall champion is the institution which has a broad-based program, achieving success in many sports, both men's and women's. The winner in each division receives a crystal trophy.[2]

NACDA All-Sports Rankings

Year Rank
1993–94 36th
1994–95 19th
1995–96 16th
1996–97 10th
1997–98 10th
1998–99 16th
Year Rank
1999–00 10th
2000–01 22nd
2001–02 10th
2002–03 23rd
2003–04 11th
2004–05 23rd
Year Rank
2005–06 20th
2006–07 17th
2007–08 8th
2008–09 9th
2009–10 19th
2010–11 19th
Year Rank
2011–12 13th
2012–13 19th
2013–14 24th
2014–15

Sports[edit]

By winning the SEC championship in Men's Basketball for the 2008-2009 season, LSU became the first SEC school to win at least 10 SEC championships in each of the big 3 sports of Football, Men's Basketball, and Baseball.[3] Furthermore, LSU is the only SEC school to win at least 1 national championship in each of the big three sports.

Baseball[edit]

Main article: LSU Tigers baseball

The LSU baseball team has won six national championships since 1991. The team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Paul Mainieri. They play home games at Alex Box Stadium/Skip Bertman Field.[4]

  • National Championships (6): 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2009
  • CWS Appearances (16): 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2013
  • SEC Championships (16): 1939, 1943, 1946, 1961, 1975, 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2009, 2012
  • Conference Tournament Championships (10): 1986, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2013

Men's Basketball[edit]

Main article: LSU Tigers basketball

The LSU men's basketball team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Johnny Jones. They play home games at the Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

  • National Championships (1): 1935
  • Final Four Appearances (4): 1953, 1981, 1986, 2006
  • Sweet Sixteen Appearances (9): 1953, 1954, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1987, 2000, 2006
  • SEC Championships (10): 1935, 1953, 1954, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1991, 2000, 2006, 2009

Women's basketball[edit]

The LSU women's basketball team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Nikki Caldwell. They play home games at the Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • AIAW/NCAA Final Four Appearances (6): 1977, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
  • NCAA Sweet Sixteen Appearances (13): 1984, 1986, 1989, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2013
  • SEC Championships (3): 2005, 2006, 2008

Cross country[edit]

The men's and women's cross country team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Dennis Shaver.

  • National Championships - Men (0): None
  • National Championships - Women (0): None
  • SEC Championships - Men (0): None
  • SEC Championships - Women (0): None

Football[edit]

Main article: LSU Tigers football

The LSU Tigers football team competes in the Division I - Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They play in Tiger Stadium, which has a capacity of 92,542. LSU has won three national championships, including two in the last decade. The first national championship was following the regular season in 1958. LSU played Clemson in the Sugar Bowl on January 1, 1959 following the team being named national champions. LSU won their second national championship in the 2003 BCS National Championship game. A controversy arose as the USC Trojans were awarded the Associated Press National Championship even though they did not play in the BCS Championship Game. LSU's win in the 2008 BCS National Championship Game (2007 season) was the Tigers third national championship. They became the first two-loss team to compete for and win the national championship, and the first team to win two Bowl Championship Series titles. The team is currently coached by Les Miles.

  • National Championships (3): 1958, 2003, 2007
  • SEC Championships (11): 1935, 1936, 1958, 1961, 1970, 1986, 1988, 1989, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2011
  • Divisional Championships (8): 1996, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2011

Men's golf[edit]

The men's golf team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Chuck Winstead. The University Club is the home venue for team.

  • National Championships (4): 1940 (co-champion with Princeton), 1942 (co-champion with Stanford), 1947, 1955
  • SEC Championships (15): 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1953, 1954, 1960, 1966, 1967, 1986, 1987

Former players

Women's golf[edit]

The women's golf team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Karen Bahnsen. The University Club is the home venue for team.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (1): 1992

Former Coaches


Women's gymnastics[edit]

The women's gymnastics team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by D-D Breaux. The Pete Maravich Assembly Center is the home venue for team.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (1): 1981

Sand volleyball[edit]

The women's sand volleyball team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is coached by Russell Brock.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (0): None

Women's soccer[edit]

The soccer team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Brian Lee. They play home games at the LSU Soccer Stadium.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (0): None

Softball[edit]

The softball team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Beth Torina. They play home games at Tiger Park.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • WCWS Appearances (3): 2001, 2004, 2012
  • SEC Championships (5): 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004

Men's swimming and diving[edit]

The men's swimming and diving teams participate in the Southeastern Conference. The swim team is currently coached by Dave Geyer and the diving team is currently coached by Doug Shaffer. They host home swim meets at the LSU Natatorium.

  • National Championships(0): None
  • SEC Championships(1): 1988

Women's Swimming and diving[edit]

The women's swimming and diving teams participate in the Southeastern Conference. The swim team is currently coached by Dave Geyer and the diving team is currently coached by Doug Shaffer. They host home swim meets at the LSU Natatorium.

  • National Championships(0): None
  • SEC Championships(0): None

Men's tennis[edit]

The Men's tennis team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Jeff Brown. They play home matches at W.T. “Dub” Robinson Stadium.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (4): 1976, 1985, 1998, 1999

Former Coaches

Women's tennis[edit]

The Women's tennis team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Julia Sell. They play home matches at W.T. “Dub” Robinson Stadium.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • SEC Championships (0): None

Former Coaches


Men's indoor track and field[edit]

The Men's indoor track and field team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Dennis Shaver. They host home track meets at the Carl Maddox Field House.

  • National Championships (2): 2001, 2004
  • SEC Championships (4): 1957, 1963, 1989, 1990

Women's indoor track and field[edit]

The Women's indoor track and field team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Dennis Shaver. They host home track meets at the Carl Maddox Field House.

  • National Championships (11): 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004
  • SEC Championships (11): 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2007, 2008, 2011

Men's outdoor track and field[edit]

The Men's outdoor track and field team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Dennis Shaver. They host home track meets at the Bernie Moore Track Stadium.

  • National Championships (4): 1933, 1989, 1990, 2002
  • SEC Championships (22): 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1951, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1988, 1989, 1990

Women's outdoor track and field[edit]

The Women's outdoor track and field team participates in the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Dennis Shaver. They host home track meets at the Bernie Moore Track Stadium.

  • National Championships (14): 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2008, 2012 (Vacated)
  • SEC Championships (8): 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1996, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012

Volleyball[edit]

The volleyball team participates in the Western division of the Southeastern Conference and is currently coached by Fran Flory. They play home games at the Pete Maravich Assembly Center.

  • National Championships (0): None
  • Final Four Appearances (2): 1990, 1991
  • SEC Championships (4): 1986, 1989, 1990, 1991

Non-varsity sports[edit]

Rugby[edit]

Founded in 1970, LSU Rugby has played its matches at the LSU Sport & Adventure Complex (SAC) since 2006. LSU has a tradition of success since its founding, highlighted by its 22-game winning streak during the 1996-97 season.[5]

More recently, LSU Rugby has been successful in conference play and in national competition. LSU plays in the Southeastern Conference against its traditional SEC rivals. In 2009, LSU defeated Colorado and Air Force to advance to the national quarterfinals before losing to San Diego State, and in 2010, LSU again defeated Colorado to qualify for the sweet 16 round of the national playoffs.[5] LSU competed at the 2011 Collegiate Rugby Championship, finishing 9th in a tournament broadcast live on NBC.[6] LSU finished first in the SEC West Division in 2012, with a 5-2 record.

Men's soccer[edit]

The LSU Men’s soccer team club team that competes in the Texas Collegiate Soccer League (Louisiana Division) since 2010. The team plays its home games at the UREC Sport & Adventure Complex (SAC) fields.[7]

In 2012, the team earned its first-ever bid to the NIRSA National Campus Championship Series (NCCS), National Soccer Championships.

Men's volleyball[edit]

The LSU Men's volleyball team competes in the Southern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association. The competes with other teams throughout the region. The team competes for championship honors in the SIVA tournament.[7]

Other sports[edit]

Sport Association
Bowling team U.S. Bowling Congress Collegiate Division, Southwest Intercollegiate Bowling Conference
Equestrian team
Men’s Lacrosse team U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association, Lone Star Alliance
Women’s Lacrosse team Women’s Collegiate Lacrosse Associates, Texas Women’s Lacrosse League
Powerlifting team
Rowing team American Collegiate Rowing Association, Southern Intercollegiate Rowing Association
Water Polo team
Men's Wrestling National Collegiate Wrestling Association, Southwest Conference

[7]

Former varsity sports[edit]

Boxing[edit]

LSU Boxing started as a club sport in 1929 and enjoyed its first varsity season in 1930. The Tigers held matches at the Huey P. Long Field House and starting in 1937 at the John M. Parker Coliseum.

In LSU’s first season, they had a record of 5-2 and 6-1 in the ensuring 1931 campaign. In 1934, LSU won its first Southeastern Conference title by beating rival Tulane. Late in the 1930s, LSU won additional SEC titles and finished with a second place finish in the 1939 NCAA Tournament and a third place finish in 1940 NCAA Tournament. Some Tiger stalwarts during this period were Al Michael, Snyder Parham and Heston Daniel. World War II interrupted the sport, but LSU returned to varsity boxing in 1948.[8]

The 1949 campaign, LSU's second season after the war, proved to be its finest. Paced by individual national champions Wilbert "Pee Wee" Moss and Edsel "Tad" Thrash and coached by Jim Owen, the Tigers went undefeated in regular season play. They finished the year by beating South Carolina in front of 11,000 fans in Parker Coliseum, en route to its first and only national title. Boxing at LSU continued as a varsity sport during the early 1950s as LSU fans watched LSU greats Calvin Clary, Crowe Peele and Robert "Bobby" Freeman.[9] Late in the decade, a dwindling number of schools in the region that sponsored boxing as a varsity sport led to higher travel costs for the LSU team. Ultimately, LSU announced in 1956 it would no longer support boxing on the varsity level.[10]

LSU was one of the powers in college boxing, recording an all-time dual meet record of 101-22-6, one national championship, 31 individual conference champions, 11 individual NCAA champions and 12 NCAA runners-up.[8]

Wrestling[edit]

LSU fielded a varsity men's wrestling team from 1970-1985. It won seven Southeast Conference titles and had two eighth-place finishes in the NCAA Tournament from 1975 until the program was dropped. The wrestling program was dropped as a result of Title IX compliance issues in 1985.[11][12]

Athletic facilities[edit]

The following is a list of the athletic facilities for the LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers. It includes LSU's outdoor stadiums, indoor arenas, and training and practice facilities.

Tiger Stadium is the home stadium of the LSU football team. The stadium is also known by its nickname, "Death Valley". It opened in 1924 with an original seating capacity of 12,000. Tiger Stadium currently has a seating capacity of 102,321, making it the sixth largest stadium in the NCAA and the ninth largest stadium in the world.[13]

Tiger Stadium also has some unique features. Unlike most football fields, where only the yard lines ending in "0" are marked, Tiger Stadium also marks the yard lines ending in "5". It also has "H" style (or "offset") goal posts, as opposed to the more modern "Y" ("slingshot" or "tuning fork") style used by other schools today, although they are not the true "H" goal posts which were once ubiquitous on American football fields, since the posts are behind the uprights and connected to the uprights by curved bars. This "H" style allows the team to run through the goal post in the north end zone. The crossbar from the goalposts which stood in the north end zone of Tiger Stadium from 1955 through 1984 is now mounted above the door which leads from LSU's locker room onto the playing field. The crossbar is painted with the word "WIN!", and superstition dictates every player entering the field touch the bar on his way out the door.[13]

The Charles McClendon Practice Facility is the name of the LSU Tigers football practice facility. The facility features the LSU Football Operations Center, the Tigers Indoor Practice Facility and four outdoor 100-yard football practice fields.[14] In 2002, it was named after former LSU head coach and College Football Hall of Fame member, Charles McClendon.[15]

The LSU Football Operations Center, built in 2006, is an all-in-one facility that includes the Tigers locker room, players' lounge, weight room, training room, equipment room, video operations center and coaches offices.[16] The operations center atrium holds team displays and graphics, trophy cases and memorabilia of LSU football.[17] A nutrition center for student athletes is being added to the facility.

The LSU Indoor Practice Facility, built in 1991, is a climate-controlled 8,250 square feet facility connected to the Football Operations Center and adjacent to LSU's four outdoor 100-yard football practice fields. The facility holds the 100-yd Anderson-Feazel LSU Indoor field.[18]

  • LSU Outdoor Practice Fields

The LSU Outdoor Practice Fields consist of four outdoor practice fields that are directly adjacent to the football operations center and indoor practice facility. Three of the fields are natural grass, while the fourth has a Momentum Field Turf by SportExe playing surface.[8]

The Pete Maravich Assembly Center, opened in 1972, is the home arena to the Louisiana State University Tigers and Lady Tigers basketball teams, LSU Lady Tigers gymnastics team and LSU Lady Tigers volleyball team. The stadium is also known by its nicknames, "Deaf Dome" and "PMAC". It has a current seating capacity of 13,215. It was originally known as the LSU Assembly Center, but was renamed in honor of LSU basketball legend, Pete Maravich, shortly after his death in 1988.[19] The auxiliary gym located underneath the north section of the arena is the practice facility for the volleyball team.

The offices for the Tiger Athletic Foundation (TAF) are also located in the arena. TAF is a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to supporting Louisiana State University (LSU) and its athletics program. It is the primary source of private funding for LSU athletics.[20]

The LSU basketball practice facility which is connected to the Maravich Center was completed in 2010. The facility features separate, full-size duplicate gymnasiums for the men's and women's basketball teams. They include a regulation NCAA court in length with two regulation high school courts in the opposition direction. The courts are exact replicas of the Maravich Center game court and have two portable goals and four retractable goals. The facility also houses team locker rooms, a team lounge, training rooms, a coach's locker room and coach's offices.[21]

The building also includes a two-story lobby and staircase that ascends to the second level where a club room is used for pre-game and post-game events and is connected to the Maravich Center concourse. The lobby includes team displays and graphics, trophy cases and memorabilia of LSU Basketball.[21]

Alex Box Stadium/Skip Bertman Field is the home stadium of the LSU Tigers college baseball team and has a seating capacity of 10,326.[22] The stadium section (and LSU's previous baseball stadium 200 yards to the north) were named for Simeon Alex Box, an LSU letterman (1942), purple heart and distinguished service cross recipient, who was killed in North Africa during World War II. In 2013, the field was named in honor of former LSU head baseball coach and athletic director, Skip Bertman. The first game of the new stadium was played February 20, 2009 versus Villanova.[23]

Bernie Moore Track Stadium is the outdoor stadium for the LSU Tigers and LSU Lady Tigers track & field teams. The facility, built in 1969, has a seating capacity of 5,680.[24] In 1971, the facility was renamed after former LSU football coach, track & field coach and SEC Commissioner, Bernie Moore. Moore coached the LSU Track and Field teams for 18 years (1930–47) and led the Tigers to their first NCAA National Championship in 1933.[25] He was SEC Commissioner from 1948–1966.

Located in Bernie Moore Track Stadium is the LSU Tigers and LSU Lady Tigers track and field teams weight room. The weight room is a 2,000 square foot facility and features 10 multi-purpose power stations, 5 dumbbell stations, 4 power racks, 5 sets of competition plates, 10 competition Olympic bars, 2 multi-purpose racks and an assortment of selectorized machines.

Carl Maddox Field House is the indoor stadium for the LSU Tigers and LSU Lady Tigers track & field teams. It was built in 1975 and has a seating capacity of 3,000. In 1998, the facility was renamed in honor of former LSU Athletic Director Carl Maddox.[26]

The LSU Natatorium, opened in 1985, is the home arena for the LSU Tigers and LSU Lady Tigers swimming and diving teams. The stadium has a seating capacity of 2,200. The Natatorium features a 50-meter pool, which can be converted into two 25-meter or 25-yard pools with the use of bulkheads and includes a championship diving well with one- and three-meter springboards and five-, seven- and 10-meter platforms.[27]

The LSU Soccer Stadium is the home stadium for the LSU Lady Tigers soccer team. The two-level stadium has a seating capacity of 2,197.[28]

The University Club is the home of the LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers golf teams. The course is a 7,700 yard, Par 72 Championship-Caliber, 300-acre course originally designed in 1998 and later redesigned by former LSU All-American and PGA golfer David Toms and original designer, Jim Lipe.

The Mary and Woody Bilyeu Golf Practice Facility functions as the golf-learning center for the LSU Tigers and Lady Tigers golf teams. The clubhouse features a team meeting room, locker rooms and coaches offices.

Tiger Park is the home stadium of the LSU Lady Tigers softball team. The park, built in 2009, has an official seating capacity of 1,289. The stadium also features an outfield berm that can accommodate an additional 1,200 fans.[29]

W.T. "Dub" Robinson Stadium serves as the home of the LSU Tigers and LSU Lady Tigers tennis teams. The stadium, built in 1976, has a seating capacity of 550. It is named in honor of former Tigers and Lady Tigers tennis head coach W.T "Dub" Robinson. The facility has six varsity tennis courts plus an additional six practice courts. The stadium features a meeting room, locker rooms, players lounge, media room and equipment room.[30]

The LSU Strength and Conditioning facility or LSU North Stadium weight room, built in 1997, is located in Tiger Stadium.[31] Measuring 10,000-square feet with a flat surface, it has 28 multi-purpose power stations, 36 assorted selectorized machines and 10 dumbbell stations along with a plyometric specific area, medicine balls, hurdles, plyometric boxes and assorted speed and agility equipment.[32][33] The weight room also features 2 treadmills, 4 stationary bikes, 2 elliptical cross trainers, a stepper and stepmill.[34]

LSU Cox Communications Academic Center for Student-Athletes[edit]

The LSU Cox Communications Academic Center for Student-Athletes is located in the Gym/Armory building. The building opened in 1930 and was completely renovated and reopened in 2002 to house the Academic Center for Student-Athletes.[35]

The goal of the academic center is to offer a comprehensive framework tailored to improve the academic skill set of each student-athlete.[36] The 54,000 square foot Academic Center for Student-Athletes is complete with an entry/atrium, 1,000-seat Bo Campbell auditorium, computer labs, instructional technology lab, resource library with tech center, study area, tutorial center, meeting rooms, classrooms, student learning center, Shaquille O'Neal life skills labs and offices, Eric Hill communications studio, career center and Academic Hall of Fame.[37][38]

LSU traditions[edit]

Mike the Tiger[edit]

Main article: Mike the Tiger

Mike the Tiger is the official mascot of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and serves as the graphic image of LSU athletics. Mike is the name of both the live and costumed mascots.[39] Mike the Tiger lives in a habitat (situated between Tiger Stadium and the Pete Maravich Assembly Center) which includes among its amenities lush plantings, a waterfall, a flowing stream that empties into a wading pond, and rocky plateaus.

School colors[edit]

LSU's official colors are Royal Purple and Old Gold.[40] There is some discrepancy in the origin of LSU's current official colors. It is believed that purple and gold were first worn time by an LSU team in the spring of 1893 when the LSU baseball squad beat Tulane in the first intercollegiate contest played in any sport by Louisiana State University.[41]

In another story, before LSU's first ever football game, football coach/chemistry professor Dr. Charles Coates and some of his players purchased ribbon to adorn their gray jerseys as they prepared to play the first LSU football game versus Tulane. Stores were stocking ribbons in the colors of Mardi Gras—purple, gold and green—for the coming Carnival season. However, none of the green had arrived, so all of the purple and gold stock were purchased.[41]

"Fight for LSU"[edit]

"Fight for LSU" is the University's official fight song. The band plays "Fight for LSU" often, most notably when the team enters the field (while the band is in a tunnel formation at the end of its pregame performance), successfully kicks a field goal, scores an extra point, or completes a two-point conversion. Following a halftime performance, the band often exits the field while playing "Fight for LSU."

Like Knights of old, Let's fight to hold
The glory of the Purple Gold.
Let's carry through, Let's die or do
To win the game for dear old LSU.
Keep trying for that high score;
Come on and fight,
We want some more, some more.
Come on you Tigers, Fight! Fight! Fight!
for dear old L-S-U.
RAH![41]

Louisiana State University Tiger Marching Band[edit]

The Louisiana State University Tiger Marching Band (also called The Golden Band from Tigerland or simply the Tiger Band) is known by LSU fans and foes alike for the first four notes of its pregame salute sounded on Saturday nights in Tiger Stadium. This 325-member marching band performs at all LSU football home games, all bowl games, and select away games and represents the University at other functions as one of its most recognizable student and spirit organizations.

On football game days, the band marches from the band hall to Tiger Stadium, stopping along the way at Victory Hill, located right outside the stadium. "Thousands of fans lining North Stadium Drive listen for the cadence of drums announcing the band's departure from the Greek Theatre" and await the impending arrival of the band.[42] The band stops on the hill and begins to play the opening strains of the "Pregame Salute." Then, while playing the introduction to "Touchdown for LSU," the band begins to run in tempo through the streets and down the hill amidst the crowd of cheering fans. The band also marches from the stadium to the band hall upon the conclusion of the game, a practice not usually employed by other bands.[43]

One of the most celebrated traditions carried on by the band is its pregame performance at each home football game. The performance includes pieces from the band’s expansive repertoire of school songs, including "Pregame Salute"/"Touchdown for LSU".[44] The band begins the performance in the south end zone of the stadium and is called to attention by the drum major right before he marches out across the end zone in front of the band. Stopping at the goal line, the drum major wields his mace and uses his whistle to signal the band to take the field. The band marches out of the end zone to the beat of a single bass drum. The golden girls and color guard accompany the band on the field. The band stands at attention and then plays the opening chords of the salute (which are taken from the tune "Tiger Rag"), the band turns to face all four corners of the stadium. The crowd explodes in cheers. Once the band salutes each part of the stadium, the pace of the music and the marching picks up, the music transitions into Long’s "Touchdown for LSU," and the band sweeps the field. Toward the end of the song, the band breaks the fronts and spells out "LSU."

In the "LSU" formation, the band plays the "LSU Alma Mater" and the "Star-Spangled Banner. The band then plays LSU's official fight song, "Fight for LSU" as it salutes both sides of the stadium. Upon switching formations, the band plays the second half of "Tiger Rag," which culminates in the crowd chanting "T-I-G-E-R-S, TIGERS!' in unison. This is followed the "First Down Cheer," to which the crowd in unison responds to each of the three refrains with "GEAUX! TIGERS!" and to the final refrain with "LSU!" The band immediately breaks into an encore performance of "Touchdown for LSU" as it marches to the north end zone, and then breaks to form a tunnel through which the football team will enter the field.

The band also performs on First, second, and third down when the Tigers are on offense. The "First Down Cheer" includes the "Hold that Tiger" musical phrase from "Tiger Rag." The "Third Down Cheer" is based on the song "Eye of the Tiger" made famous by Survivor. The piece, "Tiger Bandits" was created to pay homage to the defensive unit from the 1958 national championship football team. Coach Paul Dietzel called the unit the "Chinese Bandits."[45] The title of the song was eventually changed to "Tiger Bandits" (or just simply "Bandits"). The band plays the song when the LSU defense forces the opposing team to give up possession of the football. With arms extended out, LSU fans bow to pay homage to the defensive stop.

Bengal Brass[edit]

The Bengal Brass is a group of 60 members selected from the ranks of the band constitute the Bengal Brass Basketball Band, often simply referred to as Bengal Brass.[46] This group of all-brass musicians (and percussionist on a trap set) is often split into two squads—purple and gold—and performs at LSU select home volleyball matches, many home gymnastics meets, all home men’s basketball, and all home women’s basketball games in the Pete Maravich Assembly Center. Bengal Brass also travels with the men’s and women’s basketball teams during postseason play.

Golden Girls & Colorguard[edit]

The LSU Golden Girls, a feature unit with the Tiger Band and the oldest and most established danceline on the LSU campus, was created in 1959 as the Ballet Corps by then director of bands Thomas Tyra.[47] The Golden Girl moniker became official in 1965. Today, the line includes fourteen to eighteen dancers who audition each year to make the line and who are often members of private dance studios.[44]

The LSU Colorguard, a flag twirling unit not to be confused with a traditional military colorguard, was established in 1971.[48] Twenty-four to twenty- eight female twirlers are selected from an audition process.[48]

LSU Cheerleaders[edit]

The LSU Cheerleaders consist of both male and female cheerleaders that perform at LSU football and men's and women's basketball games. The cheerleaders lead the crowd in numerous cheers during game play and breaks. Prior to home football games the LSU cheerleaders ride atop Mike the Tiger's mobile unit, lead the crowd in cheers such as the "Geaux Tigers" cheer and lead the football team onto the field prior to the game and after halftime. The cheerleaders are located on both sidelines during football games and are located along the baseline for home basketball games. LSU's cheerleaders also compete against other universities cheerleading squads in competitions sanctioned by the Universal Cheerleaders Association (UCA). The 1989 Tiger cheerleaders won the UCA National Championship.[49]

LSU Tiger Girls[edit]

The LSU Tiger Girls, were established as a danceline for the LSU men's and women's basketball teams. The all-female squad performs during all home games and other university and non-university sponsored functions. The Tiger Girls also compete against other universities dance teams in competitions sanctioned by the Universal Dance Association (UDA)[50]

LSU Athletic Hall of Fame[edit]

LSU Athletic Hall of Fame - Jack and Priscilla Andonie Museum

The Louisiana State University Athletic Hall of Fame recognizes members of the athletics program that have made a lasting impact on the university. To be eligible for the LSU Hall of Fame in the Athlete category, an individual must have earned a college degree and gained national distinction through superlative performance. Hall of Fame candidates must also have established a personal reputation for character and citizenship. To be eligible in the Coach/Administrator category, the individual must have made significant contributions to LSU Athletics and gained national distinction through exceptional accomplishments in his or her field of expertise while establishing an image that reflects favorably upon the University.

The Jack and Priscilla Andonie Museum located on the campus of LSU in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is the physical location of the Louisiana State University Athletic Hall of Fame.

Tiger Athletic Foundation[edit]

The Tiger Athletic Foundation or TAF is a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to supporting Louisiana State University (LSU) and its athletics program. It is the primary source of private funding for LSU athletics and contributions to TAF benefit every athlete and every team at LSU. TAF has become a critical element in the success of LSU Athletics by providing private funding for scholarships, academic rewards, new athletic facilities and facility upgrades. In addition to contributions to the athletic scholarship fund, TAF will continue to provide funding for academic programs and facilities that benefit all LSU students.[51][52]

Athletic directors[edit]

Name Years Served
Russ Cohen 1928-1931
T.P. "Skipper" Heard 1931-1954
Jim Corbett 1954-1967
Harry Rabenhorst 1967-1968
Carl Maddox 1968-1978
Paul Dietzel 1978-1982
Bob Brodhead 1982-1987
Joe Dean 1987-2000
Skip Bertman 2001-2008
Joe Alleva 2008–Present

Broadcast information[edit]

The LSU Sports Radio Network's flagship station WDGL-FM ("The Eagle 98.1") in Baton Rouge.

Name Position
Jim Hawthorne Director of Broadcasting; Play-by-Play (Football, Men's Basketball, Baseball)
Gordy Rush Sideline Reporter (Football)
Doug Moreau Analyst (Football)
Patrick Wright Play-by-Play (Women's Basketball, Softball)
Kevin Ford Studio Host (Football); Analyst/Play-by-Play (Men's Basketball)
Ricky Blanton Analyst (Men's Basketball)
Charles Hanagriff Play-by-Play/Analyst (Baseball)
Bill Franques Analyst (Baseball)
Kent Lowe Analyst (Softball)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ First SEC "triple-double" 2theadvocate.com
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  43. ^ http://www.bands.lsu.edu/about
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  45. ^ "National Champions - 1958". LesMiles.net. Louisiana State University Athletic Department. Accessed on 3 June 2007. 
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  47. ^ "LSU Golden Girls". Louisiana State University Department of Bands. Accessed on 3 June 2007. 
  48. ^ a b "LSU Colorguard". Louisiana State University Department of Bands. Accessed on 3 June 2007. 
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  52. ^ https://www.lsutaf.org/History

External links[edit]