LSWR 395 class

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LSWR 395 class
Feltham Locomotive Depot geograph-2654120-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
3167 at Feltham depot 1947
Specifications
Power type Steam
Designer William Adams
Builder Neilson & Co.
Serial number Neilson 2747–2758, 2939–2950, 3376–3395, 3453–3466
Build date 1881–1886
Total produced 70
Configuration 0-6-0
UIC classification Cn
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 5 ft 1 in (1.549 m)
Length 48 ft 0 34 in (14.65 m)
Height 12 ft 5 58 in (3.80 m)
Axle load 13.60 long tons (13.8 t)
Weight on drivers 37.60 long tons (38.2 t)
Locomotive weight 37.60 long tons (38.2 t)
Tender weight 31.65 long tons (32.2 t)
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 3.00 long tons (3.0 t)
Water capacity 2,500 imp gal (11,000 l; 3,000 US gal)
Boiler pressure 140 psi (0.97 MPa)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 17.5 in × 24 in (444 mm × 610 mm)
Tractive effort 14,339 lbf (63.8 kN)
Career
Railroad(s) LSWR · ROD · Palestine Railways · Mesopotamian Railways · SR
Class 460
Power class LSWR / SR: G
BR: 2F
Number in class 1 January 1923: 20;
1 January 1948: 18
Withdrawn 1916–1959
Disposition All scrapped

On the LSWR 1881-1923[edit]

The LSWR 395 class was a class of goods 0-6-0 steam locomotives designed for the London and South Western Railway by William Adams as part of his modernisation programme. All 70 were constructed by Neilson and Company between 1881 and 1886. The last 34 locomotives differed in being slightly longer and heavier.[1]

Early members of the class were numbered in a continuous series of new numbers 395-406. Some later batches re-used numbers of withdrawn or duplicated locomotives. The 395 was a long-lived class, with several lasting for 70 years. Between 1908 and 1924, 54 locomotives were renumbered to the duplicate list by prefixing their existing number with a "0".

Outside the UK 1916-1945[edit]

Between 1916 and 1918 fifty locomotives were sold to the British Government for use by the Railway Operating Division of the Royal Engineers. These included all 16 not in the duplicate list. The ROD transferred 36 of the class to its Palestine Military Railway and nine for service in the Mesopotamian campaign. In 1918 seven of those delivered to Palestine were transferred to Mesopotamia.

In 1919 military-controlled railways and equipment in Mesopotamia were transferred to the civilian Mesopotamian Railways, including all 16 class 395's which the new company renumbered 423-438.[2] In 1920 the civilian Palestine Railways was formed and took over the remaining PMR lines and stock, including all 29 class 395's remaining in Palestine. In 1928 PR withdrew 22 of the class and sold them for scrap. The remaining seven (0166, 0395, 0398, 0405, 0444, 503 and 508) remained in PR service until 1936 and were not scrapped until 1944-45.[3]

In the UK 1923-1959[edit]

No. 30567 at Feltham Locomotive Depot 11 May 1959.
shunting at Woking in 1955

After the First World War twenty class 395's remained in Great Britain in L&SWR service: 029, 083, 0101, 0153–0155, 0163, 0167, 0397, 0400, 0433, 0436, 0439–0442, 0496, 0506, 0509, 0515. In the grouping in 1923 these passed to the Southern Railway. In 1933 the SR withdrew 0153 and 0515. In 1948 under the nationalisation of Britain's Railways the remaining 18 locomotives entered British Railways stock and were renumbered in a continuous series 30564–30581. Withdrawals resumed in 1953, with the last one, 30567 ( 154) being withdrawn in September 1959 after 76 years of service. All were scrapped.

Table of locomotive orders[edit]

Table of locomotive orders
Year Builder serial number Quantity LSWR Numbers Notes
1881 Neilson & Co. 2747–2751 5 395–399
1882 Neilson & Co. 2752–2758 7 400–406
1883 Neilson & Co. 2939–2950 12 153–167
1883 Neilson & Co. 2956-2967 12 433–444
1885 Neilson & Co. 3376–3391 16 496–511
1885 Neilson & Co. 3453–3462 10 27–30, 67, 71,
101, 105, 134, 148
67 and 71 renumbered
83 and 84 in 1889
1886 Neilson & Co. 3392–3395 4 512–515
1886 Neilson & Co. 3463–3466 4 168, 172, 174–175

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russell (1991) p. 147
  2. ^ Hughes (1981) p. 116
  3. ^ Cotterell (1984) p. 127
  • Cotterell, Paul (1984). The Railways of Palestine and Israel. Tourret Publishing. pp. 28, 127. ISBN 0-905878-04-3. 
  • Hughes, Hugh (1981). Middle East Railways. Continental Railway Circle. pp. 98, 116. ISBN 0-9503469-7-7. 
  • Russell, J. H. (1991). Pictorial Record of Southern Locomotives. Haynes (Oxford Publishing). pp. 147–150. ISBN 0-86093-443-8.