La Nación

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For other similarly named newspapers, see La Nación (disambiguation).
La Nación
La Nacion Logo.png
LaNacion2011.jpg
The front page of La Nación April 9, 2011.
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Mitre Family
Publisher Bartolomé Mitre
Founded 1870
Political alignment conservative, right wing, economic liberalism
Language Spanish
Headquarters Buenos Aires, Argentina
Circulation 160,000
Official website www.lanacion.com.ar

La Nación (Spanish: The Nation) is an Argentine daily newspaper. The country's leading conservative paper, the centrist Clarín is its main competitor.[1]

Overview[edit]

The paper was founded as La Nación Argentina on January 4, 1870, by former Argentine President Bartolomé Mitre and associates; until 1914, the managing editor was José Luis Murature, Foreign Minister of Argentina from 1914-1916. The daily was renamed La Nación on August 28, 1945.

Bouchard Plaza, the current writing headquarters.

Enjoying Latin America's largest readership until the 1930s, its daily circulation averaged around 350,000, and exceeded only by Crítica, a Buenos Aires tabloid.[2] The 1945 launch of Clarín created a new rival, and following the 1962 closure of Crítica, and the 1975 suspension of Crónica, La Nación secured its position as the chief market rival of Clarín.[1]

La Nación's daily circulation averaged 165,166 in 2012, and still represented nearly 20% of the daily newspaper circulation in Buenos Aires; the paper is also distributed nationwide and around the world.[3]

Some of the most famous writers in the Spanish-speaking world: José Martí, Miguel de Unamuno, Eduardo Mallea, José Ortega y Gasset, Rubén Darío, Alfonso Reyes, Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa and Manuel Mujica Láinez have all appeared regularly in its columns.

Originally published in Bartolomé Mitre's home (today, the Museo Mitre), its offices were moved a number of times until, in 1929, a Plateresque headquarters on Florida Street was inaugurated.[4] The publishing group today is headquartered in the Bouchard Plaza Tower, a 26-story Post-modern office building developed between 2000 and 2004 over the news daily's existing, six-story building.[5]

The director of La Nación, Bartolomé Mitre (the founder's great-great-grandson), shares control of ADEPA, the Argentine newspaper industry trade group, and of Papel Prensa, the nation's leading newsprint manufacturer, with Grupo Clarín, and as such shares in the controversies between Clarín and Kirchnerism that developed during 2008 and 2009.[6]

In early 2012, La Nación bought ImpreMedia, the publisher of El Diario-La Prensa, La Opinión and other US-based Spanish-language newspapers. Local Hispanic community leaders have been critical of this takeover, citing the Argentine paper's conservative slant and their lack of connection to local Hispanic communities that their newly acquired newspapers represent. This new management has begun wholesale layoffs of their U.S.-based properties in cost-saving efforts that some argue will undermine their operations in the draconian manner in which this is being conducted. See Angelo Falcón's The End of El Diario-La Prensa? (2012)

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°36′03″S 58°22′08″W / 34.60083°S 58.36889°W / -34.60083; -58.36889