Laban Wheaton

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Laban Wheaton
LabanWheaton.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 9th district
In office
March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1815
Preceded by Josiah Dean
Succeeded by John Reed, Jr.
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from 's 10th district
In office
March 3, 1815 – 1817
Preceded by Elijah Brigham
Succeeded by Marcus Morton
Chief Justice of the
Court of Sessions for Bristol County
In office
May 25, 1819 – 1820
Preceded by Josiah Dean[1]
Succeeded by Office Abolished
Chief Justice of
The Court of Common Pleas of Bristol County
In office
May 18, 1810 – May 25, 1819
Personal details
Born March 13, 1754
Mansfield, Massachusetts
Died March 23, 1846(1846-03-23) (aged 92)
Norton, Massachusetts
Resting place Norton Cemetery
Political party Federalist
Children Laban M. Wheaton[2]
Alma mater Harvard

Laban Wheaton (March 13, 1754 – March 23, 1846) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Mansfield, Massachusetts, Wheaton attended Wrentham (Massachusetts) Academy. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1774. He studied theology under private instructor at Woodstock, Connecticut. He also studied law.

Wheaton was admitted to the bar in 1788 and commenced practice in Milton, Massachusetts.

Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[edit]

Wheaton served as member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1803-1808, and again in 1825.

Judicial career[edit]

Wheaton served as judge of the Bristol County Court. He was appointed chief justice of the court of common pleas of Bristol County May 18, 1810, which position he held until appointed chief justice of the court of sessions for Bristol County[1] on May 25, 1819, but this court was abolished in 1820.[3]

Election to congress[edit]

Laban Wheaton.png

Wheaton was elected as a Federalist to the Eleventh and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1817).

In 1834 Wheaton established the Wheaton Female Seminary (now Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, as a memorial to his recently deceased daughter.

Death and burial[edit]

Wheaton died in Norton, Massachusetts, March 23, 1846, he was interred in Norton Cemetery.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Davis, William Thomas (1895), Bench and Bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Volume II, Boston, MA: The Boston History Company, pp. 237–238. 
  2. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1895), Bench and Bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Volume II, Boston, MA: The Boston History Company, p. 336. 
  3. ^ Hurd, Duane Hamilton (1883), History of Bristol County, Massachusetts: With Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Part 2, Philadelphia, PA: J. W. Lewis & Co., p. 627. 
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Josiah Dean
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 9th congressional district

March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1815
Succeeded by
John Reed, Jr.
Preceded by
Elijah Brigham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 10th congressional district

March 3, 1815 – 1817
Succeeded by
Marcus Morton
Legal offices
Preceded by
Judge of the Bristol County Court Succeeded by
Preceded by
Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas of Bristol County
May 18, 1810 – May 25, 1819
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Josiah Dean
Chief Justice of the Court of Sessions for Bristol County
May 25, 1819 – 1820
Succeeded by
Office Abolished

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.