Labial-velar nasal

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Labial-velar nasal
ŋ͡m
IPA number 119 (114)
Encoding
Entity (decimal) ŋ​͡​m
Unicode (hex) U+014B U+0361 U+006D
X-SAMPA Nm
Kirshenbaum Nm
Sound

The labial–velar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ŋ͡m.

The labial–velar nasal is found in West and Central Africa and eastern New Guinea.[citation needed]

Features[edit]

Features of the labial–velar nasal:

  • Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral, with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop.
  • Its place of articulation is labial–velar, which means it is simultaneously articulated with the lips and with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the velum). The dorsal closure is made and released slightly before the labial closure, but they overlap for most of their duration.
  • Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation. However, in some languages (like Swiss German) it can just mean that this consonant is pronounced shorter and weaker than its voiceless counterpart, while its voicedness or lack thereof is not relevant. In such cases it's more accurate to call such sounds lenis or lax.
  • It is a nasal consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the nose, either exclusively (nasal stops) or in addition to through the mouth.

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Vietnamese[1] đúng [ɗuŋ͡m] 'correct' Allophone of /ŋ/ after /u/ and /w/. See Vietnamese phonology

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thompson (1959:458–461)

Bibliography[edit]