Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century

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Harry Braverman's Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century was one of the most important sociological books of its era. It revived academic interest in both the history and the sociology of workplaces setting the agenda for many subsequent historians and sociologists of the workplace. The work started what came to be called, using Braverman's phraseology, "the labor process debate". This had as its focus a close examination the nature of "skill" and the finding that there was a decline in the use of skilled labor as a result of managers strategy for control. It also documented the workers resistance to such managerial strategies.[1]

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  1. ^ Meiksins, P. (1994). "Labor and Monopoly Capital for the 1990s: A Review and Critique of the Labor Process Debate". Monthly Review 46 (6): 45–59. doi:10.14452/MR-046-06-1994-10_4.  edit