Labour Party (UK) leadership election, 2010

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Labour Party (UK) leadership election
United Kingdom
2007 ←
16 August 2010 (2010-08-16) – 22 September 2010 (2010-09-22)

  Ed Miliband.jpg David Miliband 2.jpg Ed Balls 2.jpg
Candidate Ed Miliband David Miliband Ed Balls
First preferences 34.33% 37.78% 11.79%
Two-candidate preferred 50.65% 49.35%

  Andrew Burnham, September 2009 1 cropped.jpg Diane Abbott, after New Statesman hustings, cropped.jpg
Candidate Andy Burnham Diane Abbott
First preferences 8.68% 7.42%
Two-candidate preferred

Leader before election

Harriet Harman (pro tempore)

Elected Leader

Ed Miliband

The 2010 Labour Party leadership election was triggered by a general election which resulted in a hung parliament. On 10 May, Gordon Brown resigned as Leader of the Labour Party. The following day, he stepped down as Prime Minister.[1] The National Executive Committee decided the timetable for the election the result of which would be announced at the annual party conference.[2][3] On 25 September, Ed Miliband became the new Leader of the Labour Party.[4]

Procedure[edit]

The rules of the Labour Party state that "each nomination [for leader] must be supported by 12.5 per cent of the Commons members of the Parliamentary Labour Party."[5] As the number of Labour MPs is 257 (the 258 returned at the general election[6] minus Eric Illsley, who was suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party)[7] 33 MPs need to support any nomination. Nominations opened on 24 May and were to close on 27 May,[8] but the deadline was extended to 9 June after complaints from John McDonnell, Diane Abbott and Ed Miliband that the short deadline provided insufficient time to secure the 33 nominations from MPs needed for inclusion on the ballot.[2][9] The ballot took place between 1 and 22 September, with the results announced on the first day of the party's conference in Manchester on 25 September.[3] There were three distinct electorates, the electors of which cast their votes on a "one member, one vote" basis in each applicable category:

  1. Labour members of the House of Commons and the European Parliament
  2. Individual members of the party
  3. Individual members of affiliated organisations, such as trade unions and socialist societies

Each of the three electorates or sections contributed one third (33.33 per cent) of the total votes and were counted using the Alternative Vote[10] system. The election was run by the National Executive Committee and the results were announced at the annual conference in September 2010.[5]

Union recommendation controversy[edit]

Under Labour Party rules, trade unions are allowed to make recommendations to their members, but are barred from doing this in the same communication that contains the ballot paper. During the election, it emerged that both the GMB and Unite had included both an envelope containing the ballot paper, and promotional material for Ed Miliband, their favoured candidate, in the same envelope, attracting criticism that they had breached the spirit of the rules.[11][12]

Candidates[edit]

At a meeting of the Cabinet held on 10 May 2010, it was agreed that no one would announce their candidacy until after formal negotiations in regards to forming a government were resolved.[13] The Conservative Party and Liberal Democrats formed a coalition on 11 May, and David Miliband became the first person to announce his candidacy the following day. A total of six candidates emerged by 20 May:

On 9 June John McDonnell withdrew from the contest[21] in favour of Diane Abbott,[18] who eventually made the ballot paper.[22]

Nominations[edit]

Candidates must receive nominations from at least 12.5 per cent of the 257 Parliamentary Labour Party members (33) to appear on the ballot. John McDonnell had 16 nominations when he withdrew on 9 June, in favour of Diane Abbott.[23] The final nominations figures were as follows:[24]

Candidate Constituency Nominations Share
Diane Abbott Hackney North and Stoke Newington 33 12.84%
Ed Balls Morley and Outwood 33 12.84%
Andy Burnham Leigh 33 12.84%
David Miliband South Shields 81 31.52%
Ed Miliband Doncaster North 63 24.51%

Noteworthy MPs who declined to stand[edit]

Some MPs seen as potential candidates decided against running:

Televised debates[edit]

Title Date Moderator Channel Information
Newsnight Tuesday 15 June; 10:30 Jeremy Paxman BBC Two As it happened: Newsnight Labour leader hustings
Channel 4 News Wednesday 1 September; 19:00 Jon Snow Channel 4 Labour leadership: live Channel 4 debate
Sky News Sunday 5 September; 10:30 Adam Boulton Sky News Labour Leader Debate: Submit Your Question
Question Time Thursday 16 September; 22:35 David Dimbleby BBC One Question Time Labour leadership special

Opinion polling[edit]

Section
First-preference votes Run-off
Diane Abbott Ed Balls Andy Burnham David Miliband Ed Miliband David Miliband Ed Miliband
YouGov/The Sun (27–29 July 2010)[37]
Constituency Labour Parties 13% 7% 10% 38% 32% 50% 50%
Affiliated Socialist Societies and Trade Unions 17% 11% 13% 34% 26% 56% 44%
Parliamentary Labour Party 5% 14% 12% 39% 30% 55% 45%
Total 12% 11% 12% 37% 29% 54% 46%
YouGov/The Sun (7–10 September 2010)[38]
Constituency Labour Parties 11% 9% 10% 38% 31% 48% 52%
Affiliated Socialist Societies and Trade Unions 12% 9% 14% 29% 36% 43% 57%
Parliamentary Labour Party 4% 14% 11% 41% 29% 56% 44%
Total 9% 11% 12% 36% 32% 49% 51%

Results[edit]

In accordance with the principles of the Alternative Vote system, until one candidate won a majority, the candidate with the fewest votes in each round was eliminated and his or her second preference votes distributed to other candidates.

First round
Candidate MPs/MEPs Labour Party members Affiliated members Total
Votes  % Votes  % Votes  %  %
David Miliband 111 13.91% 55,905 14.69% 58,189 9.18% 37.78%
Ed Miliband 84 10.53% 37,980 9.98% 87,585 13.82% 34.33%
Ed Balls 40 5.01% 12,831 3.37% 21,618 3.41% 11.79%
Andy Burnham 24 3.01% 10,844 2.85% 17,904 2.83% 8.68%
Diane Abbott Red XN 7 0.88% 9,314 2.45% 25,938 4.09% 7.42%

The total of first-round votes for Balls, Burnham, and Abbott (27.89%) was less than Ed Miliband's vote (34.33%). Thus, it was certain after the first round that Balls, Burnham, and Abbott would all be eliminated; if the Party rules permitted, they could have been eliminated together, reducing the contest to two rounds.

Second round
Candidate MPs/MEPs Labour Party members Affiliated members Total
Votes  % Votes  % Votes  %  %
David Miliband 111 14.02% 57,128 15.08% 61,336 9.80% 38.89%
Ed Miliband 88 11.11% 42,176 11.13% 95,335 15.23% 37.47%
Ed Balls 41 5.18% 14,510 3.83% 26,441 4.22% 13.23%
Andy Burnham Red XN 24 3.03% 12,498 3.30% 25,528 4.08% 10.41%
Third round
Candidate MPs/MEPs Labour Party members Affiliated members Total
Votes  % Votes  % Votes  %  %
David Miliband 125 15.78% 60,375 16.08% 66,889 10.86% 42.72%
Ed Miliband 96 12.12% 46,697 12.43% 102,882 16.71% 41.26%
Ed Balls Red XN 43 5.43% 18,114 4.82% 35,512 5.77% 16.02%
Fourth round
Candidate MPs/MEPs Labour Party members Affiliated members Total
Votes  % Votes  % Votes  %  %
Ed Miliband Green tickY 122 15.52% 55,992 15.20% 119,405 19.93% 50.65%
David Miliband 140 17.81% 66,814 18.13% 80,266 13.40% 49.35%

Source: Labour Party website

Results map[edit]

The map below shows the results of the leadership election by constituency. David Miliband took the most constituencies, winning 577 in total. He was followed by Ed Miliband who took sixty-seven constituencies. Andy Burnham won eight seats, all in north-west England, Ed Balls took two constituencies (his own, Morley & Outwood, and that of his wife, Yvette Cooper, Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford), and Diane Abbott won no constituencies. All ties with the exception of Wigan (Andy Burnham and David Miliband) were between David and Ed Miliband. Northern Ireland was counted as one constituency.[39]

Green indicates constituencies won by David Miliband, light blue for Ed Miliband, pink for Andy Burnham, yellow for Ed Balls and white for a tie. (Click to enlarge)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gordon Brown 'stepping down as Labour leader'". BBC News. 10 May 2010. Retrieved 10 May 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "PLP nominations period for Leadership Election to close on 9 June". Labour Party. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 23 May 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "New Labour leader to be elected at September conference". BBC News. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 18 May 2010. 
  4. ^ "Ed Miliband is elected leader of the Labour Party". BBC News. 25 September 2010. 
  5. ^ a b Chris Lennie, ed. (2008). "4". The Labour Party Rule Book 2008. The Labour Party. pp. 24–25. Retrieved 10 May 2010. 
  6. ^ "Election 2010". BBC News. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 10 May 2010. 
  7. ^ "Labour MP charged over expenses". BBC News. 19 May 2010. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "Labour's NEC agrees timetable for the election of next Leader of the Labour Party". Labour Party. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 23 May 2010. 
  9. ^ "Labour extends leadership race deadline". BBC News. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  10. ^ «Leadership elections: Labour party». Kelly, R., Lester, P., & Durkin, M. (2010). House of Commons Library Note, 6, pg. 12. Retrieved 14 November 2013.
  11. ^ Ed Miliband union backers accused over Labour ballot mail-out The Guardian 24 September 2010.
  12. ^ Unite union 'ignored rules in endorsing Ed Miliband' The Independent 10 September 2010
  13. ^ Curtis, Polly (10 May 2010). "David Miliband and Ed Balls set to launch Labour leadership bids". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 10 May 2010. 
  14. ^ "Diane Abbott enters Labour leadership contest". BBC News. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  15. ^ "Ed Balls announces he will stand for Labour leader". BBC News. 19 May 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  16. ^ "Andy Burnham enters Labour leadership contest". BBC News. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  17. ^ "Labour leadership race discredited, says MP McDonnell". BBC News. 18 May 2010. Retrieved 18 May 2010. 
  18. ^ a b Hélène Mulholland and Allegra Stratton (9 June 2010). "John McDonnell withdraws from Labour leadership race in favour of Diane Abbott". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 23 June 2010. 
  19. ^ Allegra Stratton, political correspondent (12 May 2010). "David Miliband announces Labour leadership bid". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  20. ^ "Ed Miliband to take on brother David in leader battle". BBC News. 14 May 2010. Retrieved 14 May 2010. 
  21. ^ Woodcock, Andrew (9 June 2010). "John McDonnell withdraws from Labour leadership race". London: The Independent. 
  22. ^ Mulholland, Helene (9 June 2010). "Diane Abbott makes it on to Labour leadership ballot". London: The Guardian. 
  23. ^ "John McDonnell withdraws from Labour leadership race". BBC News. 9 June 2010. Retrieved 23 June 2010. 
  24. ^ "Diane Abbott Joins 'Open' Labour Leader Race". Sky News. 9 June 2010. 
  25. ^ "Whelan and Blears on Labour leadership". BBC News. 12 May 2010. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f "Labour leadership contest: Runners and riders". BBC News. 26 May 2010. Retrieved 31 May 2010. 
  27. ^ "2010 Labour leadership election-Ed Balls". Labour Party. Retrieved 24 June 2010. 
  28. ^ "Jon Cruddas backs Diane Abbott for Labour leader". International Business Times. 5 June 2010. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  29. ^ Cowley, Jason (25 August 2010). "Exclusive: Jon Cruddas endorses David Miliband". New Statesman. Retrieved 26 August 2010. 
  30. ^ Stratton, Allegra (1 June 2010). "David Miliband wins backing of Alistair Darling in Labour leadership race". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 24 June 2010. 
  31. ^ Wintour, Patrick (1 June 2010). "Alistair Darling backs David Miliband for Labour leadership". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  32. ^ a b Evans, Judith (17 May 2010). "David Miliband hails 'next Labour' as he opens leadership bid". Times Online (London). 
  33. ^ Woodcock, Andrew (8 June 2010). "Harriet Harman nominates Diane Abbott for Labour leadership". London: The Independent. 
  34. ^ "Alan Johnson backs David Miliband for Labour leadership". Daily Telegraph (London). 12 May 2010. Retrieved 8 June 2010. 
  35. ^ "2010 Labour leadership election-Diane Abbott". Labour Party. Retrieved 24 June 2010. 
  36. ^ Smith, Lewis (12 August 2010). "Straw backs Miliband in leadership race". The Independent (London). Retrieved 12 August 2010. 
  37. ^ YouGov / Sun survey YouGov/The Sun, 29 July 2010
  38. ^ Neck and neck YouGov, 13 September 2010
  39. ^ http://www.labour.org.uk/leadership-clps

External links[edit]

News[edit]

Party websites[edit]

Candidates' leadership campaign websites[edit]