Lacey Township, New Jersey

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Lacey Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lacey
Map of Lacey Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Lacey Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lacey Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lacey Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°51′19″N 74°16′02″W / 39.855153°N 74.267152°W / 39.855153; -74.267152Coordinates: 39°51′19″N 74°16′02″W / 39.855153°N 74.267152°W / 39.855153; -74.267152[1][2]
Country United States
state New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated March 23, 1871
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor David Most (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Veronica Laureigh[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 98.530 sq mi (255.191 km2)
 • Land 83.256 sq mi (215.631 km2)
 • Water 15.274 sq mi (39.560 km2)  15.50%
Area rank 5th of 566 in state
2nd of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 72 ft (22 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 27,644
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 27,825
 • Rank 83rd of 566 in state
7th of 33 in county[12]
 • Density 332.0/sq mi (128.2/km2)
 • Density rank 470th of 566 in state
31st of 33 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08731 - Forked River[13]
08734 - Lanoka Harbor[14]
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402937380[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882072[17][2]
Website www.laceytownship.org

Lacey Township is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey and is considered part of the Jersey Shore region. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 27,644,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 2,298 (+9.1%) from the 25,346 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,205 (+14.5%) from the 22,141 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The 2010 population was the highest recorded in any decennial census. It was named for Continental Army General John Lacey.[19]

Lacey Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1871, from portions of Dover Township (now known as Toms River Township) and Union Township (now Barnegat Township). Portions of the township were taken on June 23, 1933, to form the borough of Island Beach (which is now Island Beach State Park, part of Berkeley Township).[19][20]

The Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station is located in the southern part of the township. The single-unit 636 MWe boiling water reactor power plant adjoins the Oyster Creek and is owned and operated by Exelon Corporation. It produces 9% of the state's electricity and is the nation's oldest operating nuclear power plant, having first been brought online on December 1, 1969, and is licensed to operate until April 9, 2029.[21]

Murray Grove is a Unitarian-Universalist retreat and conference center in Lanoka Harbor, traditionally considered the site where Universalism in America began.[22]

Geography[edit]

Lacey Township is located at 39°51′19″N 74°16′02″W / 39.855153°N 74.267152°W / 39.855153; -74.267152 (39.855153,-74.267152). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 98.530 square miles (255.191 km2), of which, 83.256 square miles (215.631 km2) of it is land and 15.274 square miles (39.560 km2) of it (15.50%) is water.[1][2]

Forked River (with a 2010 Census population of 5,244[23]) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Lacey Township.[24][25][26] The township also contains the unincorporated area of Lanoka Harbor. Bamber Lakes, Laurel Harbor and Sun Rise Harbor are also unincorporated communities within Lacey Township. The township's fire stations are named after the various areas of Lacey Township.

The north-south track of the Garden State Parkway serves as an informal use divider under the 1979 Pinelands Act and the subsequent Comprehensive Management Plan. To the east of the Parkway are more than 95% of Lacey's residential dwellings, located in the unincorporated areas of Lanoka Harbor and Forked River. To the Parkway's west is a mostly undisturbed pine and cedar forest, part of New Jersey's vast Pine Barrens. The forest is interspersed with a scattered few farms, houses and ranches, the tiny community of Bamber Lake and open pit gravel quarries - all of which predate passage of the Pinelands Act or were developed under its tight zoning rules. The conditions of grandfathering vary - the mines' exceptions are to expire upon the deaths of their owners whereas the farms' exceptions are indefinite. Development west of the parkway is strictly controlled by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission.[citation needed]

Many Ocean County residents commonly refer to all of Lacey Township as Forked River with the first word pronounced with two syllables (FOR-kid or FORK-id). Pronouncing the first word with one syllable is a sign of a non-native.[27][28]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 814
1890 711 −12.7%
1900 718 1.0%
1910 602 −16.2%
1920 504 −16.3%
1930 692 37.3%
1940 752 * 8.7%
1950 966 28.5%
1960 1,940 100.8%
1970 4,616 137.9%
1980 14,161 206.8%
1990 22,141 56.4%
2000 25,346 14.5%
2010 27,644 9.1%
Est. 2012 27,825 [11] 0.7%
Population sources:1880-2000[29]
1880-1920[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910-1930[33]
1930-1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 27,644 people, 10,183 households, and 7,607 families residing in the township. The population density was 332.0 per square mile (128.2 /km2). There were 11,573 housing units at an average density of 139.0 per square mile (53.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.15% (26,581) White, 0.60% (167) Black or African American, 0.14% (38) Native American, 0.80% (222) Asian, 0.02% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.14% (316) from other races, and 1.14% (314) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.74% (1,310) of the population.[8]

There were 10,183 households of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 20.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.13.[8]

In the township, 23.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.3 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,835 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,271) and the median family income was $84,031 (+/- $6,930). Males had a median income of $56,748 (+/- $3,051) versus $40,360 (+/- $3,340) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,552 (+/- $1,524). About 2.2% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 25,346 people, 9,336 households, and 7,244 families residing in the township. The population density was 301.7 people per square mile (116.5/km²). There were 10,580 housing units at an average density of 126.0 per square mile (48.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.85% White, 0.36% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.15% of the population.[35][36]

There were 9,336 households out of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.5% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.4% were non-families. 18.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.08.[35][36]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the township was $55,938, and the median income for a family was $61,298. Males had a median income of $47,406 versus $30,088 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,136. About 3.7% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lacey Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Lacey Township Committee are Mayor David E. Most (R, term ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Gary Quinn (R, 2015), Helen DelaCruz (D, 2013), Mark Dykoff (R, 2014) and Sean Sharkey (D, 2013).[38][39][40]

Recent local controversies have surrounded development and land use. In particular, a proposal to build a road on an old railroad right of way behind the ShopRite has been a major issue in the community. Other issues involve the lack of water resources to sustain the proposed Home Depot (which opened October 18, 2007) and Wal-Mart.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lacey Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[9][42][43]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[47][48]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[52] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[53] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[54] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[55] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[56] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[60][61] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[62][63][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 18,255 registered voters in Lacey Township, of which 3,172 (17.4%) were registered as Democrats, 5,043 (27.6%) were registered as Republicans and 10,035 (55.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[65] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 66.0% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 85.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 59.4% of the vote here (8,188 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 38.4% (5,286 votes) and other candidates with 1.5% (200 votes), among the 13,776 ballots cast by the township's 19,102 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.1%.[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 63.3% of the vote here (8,300 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 35.5% (4,655 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (107 votes), among the 13,102 ballots cast by the township's 17,986 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.8.[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.3% of the vote here (6,314 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.6% (2,154 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.0% (459 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (89 votes), among the 9,109 ballots cast by the township's 18,618 registered voters, yielding a 48.9% turnout.[69]

Education[edit]

The Lacey Township School District serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are three K-4 elementary schools — Cedar Creek Elementary School[71] (607 students), Forked River Elementary School[72] (539) and Lanoka Harbor Elementary School[73] (590) — Mill Pond Elementary School[74] for grades 5&6 (725) Lacey Township Middle School[75] for grades 7&8 (784) and Lacey Township High School[76] for students in grades 9-12 (1,399).[77][78]

Community[edit]

The township had an annual Night of Lights on the Forked River, which was a boat parade at night in August. Owners dressed up their boats with lights and sailed down the river at night to the Captain's Inn. This had been changed to Rock the River after the original family that supported the event withdrew from involvement. It is now sponsored by local business and organizations and known as the Lacey Lights Boat Parade.[79]

The Relay for Life had been held annually at Gille Park and brings together many residents to donate money towards cancer research. However, in 2010, the Lacey Township Committee did not allow the walk to be held at Gille, and it was moved to Veteran's Park in Bayville.

Lacey has experienced a rapid growth in recent years with the addition of many new developments and new stores being built around town. A recent example of development is a Wal-Mart.

Commerce[edit]

Lacey is home to many businesses, the largest employer being the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station.

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the township and Atlantic City on the 559 bus route.[80]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Popcorn Park Zoo is a small 7-acre (28,000 m2) zoo that hosts a wide range of abused and exploited animals and features big cats, monkeys and black bears among the 200 animals on the site. The zoo was established in 1977 at a facility covering 7 acres (2.8 ha)[81]
  • The Old Schoolhouse Museum is a small old school building that was built in the mid-19th century as the first school in Forked River, and was used as a school until 1954.[82]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Lacey Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Office of the Administrator, Lacey Township. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Lacey, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lacey township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lacey township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Forked River, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lanoka Harbor, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Township's History, Lacey Township. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 203. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  21. ^ Staff. "Feds OK new license for NJ nuclear power plant", The Washington Times, April 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2012. "The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission voted 3-1 on Wednesday to grant a new license to the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in Lacey Township, N.J. It provides 9 percent of New Jersey’s electricity.Oyster Creek and Nine Mile Point Nuclear Generating Station in upstate New York both went online Dec. 1, 1969. But Oyster Creek is considered older because its initial license was granted first."
  22. ^ "Towns of Lanoka Harbor and Murray Grove: Written Historical and Descriptive Data", Historic American Buildings Survey, National Park Service. Accessed December 26, 2012. "Murray Grove is further renowned as the 'birthplace of Universalism America,' where the first Universalist sermon in the United States was preached."
  23. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Forked River CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  24. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  25. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  27. ^ Say What? : From 'Morris' River to 'R-Kansas' Avenue, Area Residents have own way of speaking., The Press of Atlantic City, April 24, 2003
  28. ^ Suhay, Lisa. "JERSEYANA; Where They Don't Speak With Forked Tongue", The New York Times, December 8, 2002. Accessed September 13, 2013. "'It's FORK-ed River,' Jennifer Sawicki, 25, who was born in the town, said with a laugh.... Donald M. Launer, a resident and author of A Cruising Guide to New Jersey Waters (Rutgers Press, 1997), had a long laugh at the idea of asking people how to pronounce the name and at the mere thought that anyone in Forked River would say Forkt. 'The name originated in the 1700's, and it is the typical archaic pronunciation that has just stuck,' he said."
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  31. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  33. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  34. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  35. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Lacey township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  36. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lacey township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  37. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Lacey township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  38. ^ Township of Lacey Government, Lacey Township. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  39. ^ 2012 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 5. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  40. ^ Township of Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2013
  41. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  45. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  47. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  48. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  50. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  60. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  62. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
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  64. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  65. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  66. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  67. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  68. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2012.
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  70. ^ Data for the Lacey Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  71. ^ Cedar Creek Elementary School, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  72. ^ Forked River Elementary School, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  73. ^ Lanoka Harbor Elementary School, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  74. ^ Mill Pond Elementary School, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  75. ^ Lacey Township Middle School, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  76. ^ Lacey Township High School, Lacey Township High School. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  77. ^ Schools, Lacey Township School District. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  78. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Lacey Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 27, 2013.
  79. ^ Farquharson, Ian. Rock the River Boat Parade in New Jersey, local.com. Accessed September 13, 2013. "Originally known as the Night of Lights Boat Parade, the event went through a few changes in the late 2000s, when local businesses took over sponsorship and organization. It became known as Rock the River in 2008, and these days commonly has the name Lacey Lights Boat Parade."
  80. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  81. ^ Popcorn Park, Associated Humane Societies. Accessed September 13, 2103.
  82. ^ "JERSEY SHORE DIVERSIONS BEYOND THE BEACH", The New York Times, July 12, 1981. Accessed July 27, 2013. "In Forked River, the Old Schoolhouse Museum on Route 9 is a tworoom grade school that was built around the time of the Civil War and was not retired from service until 1954."
  83. ^ Assembly Member Christopher J. Connors, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 9, 2007.
  84. ^ Goodnough, Abby; and Weber, Bruce. "Before Prom Night, a Suspect Was the Girl Next Door", The New York Times, July 2, 1997. Accessed December 26, 2012.
  85. ^ THE TOP 20 GREATEST ATHLETES - No. 20: Keith Elias '94, Football, RB, The Daily Princetonian, November 14, 2006.
  86. ^ "Palguta Named to Men's Soccer All-Ivy Second Team", CSTV. November 16, 2004. Accessed October 10, 2007. "It was announced today by the Ivy League offices that Cornell senior defenseman Scott Palguta (Forked River, N.J.) has been given All-Ivy honors, being named to the second team."
  87. ^ Vosseller, Bob. "Interact, Rotary, wrestlers raise funds", Times Beacon, May 29, 2008. Accessed December 26, 2012. "A Jersey Shore title match will be held between champion Nicky Oceans versus Lacey Township's own Rhett Titus."

External links[edit]

Surrounding Communities[edit]