Lagori

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Lagori
Dabba Kali2.jpg
A game of Dabba Kali in Kerala
Age range 4 and up
Setup time less than a minute
Playing time no limit
Random chance Low
Skill(s) required Running, Observation, Speed, Strength, Throwing
Kids playing Lagori in a Bangalore street

Lagori, dikori or lagoori (Persian: هفت‌سنگ (haft sang), meaning seven stones), also known as lingocha, widely played in South India, is a game played between two teams in an unlimited area involing a ball and a pile of flat stones. A member of one team (the seekers)[1] throws a soft ball at a pile of stones to knock them over. The seekers then try to restore the pile of stones while the opposing team (the hitters)[1] throws the ball at them. If the ball touches a seeker, he is out and his team continues without him. But a team member can always safeguard himself by touching the opposite team member before the ball hits him.

Additional rules[edit]

These additional rules make the game even more interesting.

  • Clearly mark the boundary. If any of the seekers crosses it then he is out.
  • If the person trying to knock down the pile cannot do it in three tries then he is out.
  • In any of the three tries, if the thrower's ball does not knock down the pile and is caught by an opponent after the first bounce then the thrower is out.
  • If the thrower's ball bounces off the pile and an opponent catches it then the thrower's whole team is out.
  • If the seekers succeed in restoring the pile then they can use the point scored to buy back their ousted team mate.
  • if the opponent player hit the ball on the leg of throwers and its team the all players are out.

Skills[edit]

  • Throwing the ball;
  • Evading the ball;
  • Building the pile of stones;
  • Distracting the opposite team from building the pile.

Alternative Names[edit]

Olapanthu - ball made of coconut leaves - used to play the game in Kerala

In other parts of the country, the same game is known several other names:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The street game of LAGORI". Sportales.com. 28 January 2007. Retrieved 29 July 2011. 
  2. ^ Cohen, Noam. "When Knowledge Isn’t Written, Does It Still Count?" The New York Times. August 7, 2011. Retrieved on September 22, 2011.
  3. ^ Seven stones (ஏழு கல்லு)

External links[edit]