Lake Elsinore Diamond

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Lake Elsinore Diamond
Storm Stadium
LakeElsinoreDiamond.JPG
Location 500 Diamond Drive
Lake Elsinore, CA 92530
Coordinates 33°39′15″N 117°18′7″W / 33.65417°N 117.30194°W / 33.65417; -117.30194Coordinates: 33°39′15″N 117°18′7″W / 33.65417°N 117.30194°W / 33.65417; -117.30194
Owner City of Lake Elsinore
Operator Storm Entertainment
Capacity 6,066 permanent stadium seats
Field size Left Field - 330 ft
Left-Center Power Alley - 425 ft
Center Field - 400 ft
Right-Center Power Alley - 386 ft
Right Field - 310 ft
Backstop - 50 ft
Surface Tiffsport (Bermuda grass)
Construction
Broke ground October 1992
Opened April 15, 1994[4]
Construction cost $24.3 million
($38.7 million in 2014 dollars[1])
Architect HNTB[2]
General contractor Peter M. Savello & Associates Inc.[3]
Tenants
Lake Elsinore Storm (1994-present)

Lake Elsinore Diamond, commonly referred to as Storm Stadium, is a baseball park in Lake Elsinore, California. It is primarily used for baseball and is the home field of the Lake Elsinore Storm minor league baseball team, a part of the California League.[5] The field at the Lake Elsinore Diamond is named the Pete Lehr Field.

History[edit]

It was built in 1994 and has a capacity of over 8,000 people with 6,066 permanent seats.[6] The original $8 million construction estimate in 1992, however, ballooned to more than $22 million by the time of its completion.[7]

Other uses[edit]

The company that currently manages the site is Storm Entertainment, a newly developed entity of Storm Baseball. When baseball is not in season, the field is used for a number of other purposes including concerts, boxing matches, and local high school graduations, all of which can utilize temporary seating to increase the capacity to 14,000.[8] This stadium also has a yearly event for Halloween, the "Field of Screams".[9]

The field was also used as a location for the fan made film "left 4 dead - the movie".

Diamond Club[edit]

The Diamond Club is the name of the enclosed restaurant and patio in the left field corner where wedding receptions and other special events can be hosted in addition to being used as a game day restaurant open to ticketed guests.[10]

Dimensions[edit]

Right field is 310 feet away from homeplate. Center field is 400 feet. Left is 330 feet. The deepest part of the park is the left center power alley at 425 feet. The grass used is Tiffsport, a hybrid Bermuda grass, which is overseeded with ryegrass for the winter.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  2. ^ "Ballparks: Lake Elsinore Diamond". Friends of San Diego Architecture. Retrieved September 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (September 3, 1994). "Baseball No Sure Hit for Towns. Booming Minor League Looking to North County". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved April 14, 2012. 
  4. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (April 27, 1994). "Investors Discuss Vista's Minor-League Prospects". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  5. ^ "The Official Website of the California League". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Stadium". City of Lake Elsinore. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  7. ^ Lewitt, Meghan; Nealon, Sean (September 30, 2006). "Lake Elsinore, Developer Can't Cut Diamond Deal". The Press-Enterprise (Riverside). Archived from the original on May 20, 2011. Retrieved March 1, 2009. 
  8. ^ "The Diamond". Minor League Baseball. February 25, 2010. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Haunted Stadium". Haunted Stadium. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Diamond Club". Minor League Baseball. February 26, 2010. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Lake Elsinore Diamond". Storm Entertainment. Archived from the original on April 20, 2008. Retrieved March 1, 2009. 

External links[edit]