Lamar Advertising Company

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Lamar Advertising Company
Traded as NASDAQLAMR
Industry Advertising
Founded 1902
Headquarters Baton Rouge, LA
Key people Kevin P. Reilly, Sr. (retired CEO), Kevin Reilly, Jr., President and Chairman of the Board, and Sean Reilly, CEO
Products Outdoor Advertising
Website http://www.lamar.com

Lamar Advertising is an outdoor advertising company which operates billboards, logo signs, and transit displays in the U.S, Canada, and Puerto Rico.[1] The company was founded in 1902 by Charles W. Lamar and J.M. Coe, and is headquartered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[2] The company has over 200 locations in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

Outdoor Advertising Products[edit]

Bulletins: The largest standard-sized form of outdoor advertising, located on highly visible locations such as expressways and primary arteries. Bulletins are commonly used as "directionals" to reach long-distance travelers and direct them to nearby restaurants, lodging, gas stations, etc.[3]

Posters: Smaller 12'x24' Posters are smaller billboards. They are usually located in commercial areas, industrial areas, and/or major local roads. This means that they are viewed by drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Posters are traditionally used in full market coverage for medium reach and frequency. The typical size of a poster billboard is 125" x 272".[4]

Jr. Posters: Junior posters are traditionally targeted to a more pedestrian based viewership. They are located in urban neighborhoods and smaller roads. Junior posters are effective in advertising merchandise to consumers that is close by. The Standard area for posters is 5' x 11'.[5]

Digital Displays: Computer-controlled electronic billboards using large LED displays. The board holds a message for up to 10 seconds before the next message is displayed. Due to their electronic nature, they are very flexible, capable of being changed weekly, daily, or even hourly. These boards are often used to advertise time-sensitive information: special promotions, one-day sales, breaking news, price points, etc.[6]

Wallscapes: Large, elaborate, non-standard structures custom-designed to attract attention using eye-catching special effects: neon tubing, fiber optics, hydraulic movement, strobe lights, etc. These can be painted directly onto surfaces or applied with traditional printed vinyl.[7]

Buses: Buses travelling through busy metro areas are wrapped in a variety of ways to act as "mobile billboards." This form of advertising can be effective because the advertisement moves through key metropolitan areas to attract the attention of consumers. These advertisements can be presented in multiple ways. A fully wrapped bus (The Advertisement encompasses the entire exterior of the vehicle).[8] A Headlight display (This is an advertisement the covers the front of the bus).[9] King Size bus posters (These are advertisements that cover approximately 1/2 of one side of a bus ).[10] Queen-Size bus posters (These advertisements encompass slightly less space then the King Sized bus posters).[11] Finally, their are Taillight Displays (These are advertisements that cover the entire back of the bus).[12]

Shelters: Signage placed at bus stops and other transit shelters distributed throughout a market. These displays are back-lit for night viewing.[13]

Benches: Signage placed on benches located at bus stops and high-traffic intersections, visible to motorists and pedestrians.

History[edit]

Lamar Advertising Company was founded in 1902 by J.M. Coe and Charles W. Lamar. The Company became independent under its current name in 1908 in Pensacola, Florida, when Charles W. Lamar, Sr. and J.M. Coe decided to dissolve their three-year partnership using a coin toss to divide their assets. The Pensacola Opera House and the Pensacola Advertising Company that was created to promote it was to be divided between the two men. Charles W. Lamar lost the toss and was left with the less-lucrative poster company, which he renamed the Lamar Outdoor Advertising Company.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lamar Advertising Company (LAMR)". Wikinvest. WIKI Analysis. Retrieved 16 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "Lamar Advertising Company History". Funding Universe. Funding Universe. Retrieved 2 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "Bulletins". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  4. ^ "Posters". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association Of America. OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association Of America. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  5. ^ "Jr. Posters". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  6. ^ "Digital Billboards". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "Wall Murals". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  8. ^ "Fully Wrapped Buses". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media format. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  9. ^ "HEADLIGHT DISPLAYS". OAAA: Out door Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  10. ^ "King-Size Bus Posters". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  11. ^ "Queen-Size Bus Posters". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA:OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  12. ^ "Taillight Displays". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA:OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  13. ^ "Bus Shelters". OAAA: Outdoor Advertising Association of America. OAAA: OOH Media Formats. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  14. ^ "Lamar Advertising Company". Reference For Business: Encyclopedia for Business, 2nd ed. Reference For Business: Encyclopedia for Business, 2nd ed. Retrieved 16 July 2014. 

External links[edit]