Lamberhurst

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Lamberhurst
The Broadway - geograph.org.uk - 2603990.jpg
The Broadway
Lamberhurst is located in Kent
Lamberhurst
Lamberhurst
 Lamberhurst shown within Kent
Population 1,491 (2001)
OS grid reference TQ6736
Civil parish Lamberhurst
District Tunbridge Wells
Shire county Kent
Region South East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town TONBRIDGE
Postcode district TN3
Dialling code 01892
Police Kent
Fire Kent
Ambulance South East Coast
EU Parliament South East England
UK Parliament Tunbridge Wells
List of places
UK
England
Kent

Coordinates: 51°05′49″N 0°23′35″E / 51.097°N 0.393°E / 51.097; 0.393

Lamberhurst (/ˈlæmbərhɜrst/ is a village and civil parish in Kent containing the hamlets of The Down and Hook Green. At the 2001 census it had a population of 1,491.[1]

History[edit]

Prior to the Industrial Revolution, Lamberhurst was a centre for the Wealden iron industry, originally set up during Roman times. Since then it had some importance for the hop industry; was home to Margaret Thatcher; acquired an extensive golf course; has controversially been by-passed; and played a major role in English wine production.

The C of E Church is 0.5 miles (0.80 km) east of the village, a 14th/15th century building dedicated to St Mary.[2]

Lamberhurst civil parish on formation when they first became possible in the 19th century was at first in both Kent and East Sussex. The line of the county border was adjusted following the Local Government Act 1894, which required that parish boundaries be aligned with counties.[3]

Geography/Topography[edit]

The village lies in the valley of the River Teise, one of the main tributaries of the River Medway. The valley of one of its tributaries, the River Bewl, was dammed and flooded between 1973 and 1975 creating the Bewl Water reservoir. The village itself has a large conservation area with a large number of 17th and 18th century buildings.[4] and the Strict Baptist Church, established in the village since the 18th century.

Historically Significant Buildings/Gardens[edit]

To the west of the high street, The Broadway are the ruins of Bayham Abbey opened up by English Heritage and its current replacement listed gardens and house[5][6] and the 14th century Scotney Castle to the east; a property of the National Trust. The moat and lake in the grounds of the latter is the result of a dam on the River Teise.

Transport[edit]

The village was bypassed to the east in 2005 by the A21,[7] which previously ran through the village. The decision caused some controversy due to its location in the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The closest railway stations (both about 3 miles (4.8 km) distant) are Frant or Wadhurst on the north-south London to Hastings line. Bus services are provided by Autocar and Countryliner Coaches.

References[edit]

External links[edit]