Landing slot

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A landing slot, takeoff slot, or airport slot is a right granted by an airport owner which allows the slot holder to schedule a landing or departure during a specific time period.

Landing slots are allocated in accordance with guidelines set down by the IATA's Worldwide Airport Slots Group. All airports worldwide are categorized as either Level 1 (Non-Coordinated Airport), Level 2 (Schedules Facilitated Airport), or Level 3 (Coordinated Airport).

Allocated landing slots may have a commercial value and can be traded between airlines. Continental Airlines paid $209 million for four pairs of landing slots from GB Airways at London Heathrow Airport.[1]

If an airline doesn't use an allocation of slots (typically 80% usage over six months) then it can lose the rights. Airlines may operate ghost or empty flights to preserve slot allocations.[2]

Level 3 Coordinated Airports[edit]

Australia[edit]

Austria[edit]

Bangladesh[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Cambodia[edit]

Canada[edit]

Mainland China[edit]

Hong Kong[edit]

Czech Republic[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Ghana[edit]

Iceland[edit]

India[edit]

Indonesia[edit]

Iran[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Israel[edit]

Italy[edit]

Japan[edit]

Serbia/Kosovo[edit]

Malaysia[edit]

Mauritius[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Norway[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Russia[edit]

Singapore[edit]

South Africa[edit]

South Korea[edit]

Spain[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

Taiwan[edit]

Thailand[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Ukraine[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

No Level 3 designation, but nevertheless slot controlled:

[3][4] [5]

Vietnam[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes:

  1. ^ Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Kosovo. The latter declared independence on 17 February 2008, but Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. Kosovo's independence has been recognised by 108 out of 193 United Nations member states.

References:

  1. ^ UK airline to value landing slots as assets on balance sheets
  2. ^ Green anger at 'ghost flights'
  3. ^ bloomberg.com - AMR-US Airways Deal Opposed by U.S. in Antitrust Suit
  4. ^ "Airport Reservation Office". Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). 
  5. ^ Rfererence material and updated list of coordinated airports - IATA Worldwide Scheduling Guidelines