Langenburg, Saskatchewan

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Coordinates: 50°50′N 101°42′W / 50.833°N 101.700°W / 50.833; -101.700 (Langenburg, Saskatchewan)

Langenburg
Town
Motto: Family & Friends
Langenburg is located in Saskatchewan
Langenburg
Langenburg
Coordinates: 50°50′N 101°42′W / 50.833°N 101.700°W / 50.833; -101.700
Country Canada
Province Saskatchewan
Rural Municipalities (R.M.) No. 181
Post office Founded 1 February 1888
Village established 1 April 1903
Town incorporated 15 September 1959
Government
 • Mayor Don Fogg
 • Federal Electoral District M.P. Garry Breitkreuz
 • Provincial Constituency M.L.A. Bob Bjornerud
Website Langenburg, Saskatchewan
[1][2][3][4]

Langenburg /ˈlæŋənbərɡ/ is a town (population of 1, 048) in the rural municipality of Langenburg, RM No. 181, located within the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities SARM Division No. 1 and Census Division No. 5, in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.

Langenburg lies on the Yellowhead Highway (Highway 16) in the southeastern part of the province, 15 km west of the Manitoba border, at the junction with Highway 8. The nearest city is Yorkton located 70 km northwest along Highway 16. The current population stands at about 1,100.

History[edit]

What would later become the Langenburg district was surveyed by the federal government in 1880 and British settlers were already established to the northeast of present day Marchwell in the Wolverine district in the early part of the decade. Settlers of predominantly German origin began to arrive in the Langenburg area in the mid-1880s, attracted by the lure of free homesteads granted by the federal government and a promise of freedom and prosperity. The original community was called "Colony Hohenlohe" after Prince Hohenlohe von Langenburg, a German nobleman who had visited western Canada in 1883 and subsequently recommended it to German emigrants as more suitable destination than the United States.[5] In the winter of 1886–87 the Manitoba & North-Western Railway reached the area and a station named "Langenburg" was established. By 1888 the small colony could boast of a store with a post office. A year earlier, in September 1887, the Langenburg School District No. 105 had been established but it was not until August 1889 that funds to build a school were secured. When the school house opened in May 1890 there were about 40 resident ratepayers in the community and nine students on the rolls, rising a short time later to 13.[6]
There was little growth over the following decade. In 1899 an application to become incorporated as a village was unsuccessful—the number of permanent dwellings required for incorporation was 15 and there were only five.[7] In 1902, however, a new wave of immigration began with Scandinavian settlers arriving from the United States, and by April 1903 Langenburg had gained its village status.

Law and government[edit]

  • The citizens of Langenburg are represented by a town council which includes the mayor, an alderman, and five councillors. The current council members are Mayor Dave Schappert, Alderman Warren Kotzer, and Councillors Brad Sicinski, Brian Cornelius, Don Wyand, Don Fogg and Rodney Lundgren. Howard McCullough is the Town Administrator. Council meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays of the month.
  • Langenburg is located in the provincial constituency of Melville-Saltcoats, and when elections are held, voting takes place at polling stations 35 to 39 located at the Langenburg Community Centre, 101 Carl Avenue West. The most recent election of MLAs took place on Wednesday, November 7, 2007 and Bob Bjornerud of the Saskatchewan Party was re-elected.
  • The current M.P. representing Langenburg as part of the federal electoral district of Yorkton-Melville is Garry Breitkreuz, a former teacher and principal. He was first elected in 1993. He is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada.
View to the east along the tracks

Geography[edit]

See Geography of Saskatchewan for physiographic region

Economy[edit]

  • Agriculture and other resource-based industries, principally the Mosaic Company's K1 and K2 potash mines located near the town of Esterhazy, provide employment for 25% of the active labour force in the community. A further 19% are employed in the wholesale and retail sector, 18% in educational, health care and social services, 7% in finance and real estate and business services generally, while 5% work in construction and manufacturing. Other services account for the remaining 24%.[8]
  • There are a wide variety of services currently available in the Langenburg area. Permanent services include the post office, ambulance and health care (medical and dental clinics, the Care Home), R.C.M.P., fire, Senior rental units and schools. Other services include a number of retail outlets and services (accountants, auto dealers, beauty salons and barber shops, clothing shops, hotel and restaurants, grocery and hardware supplies, pharmacy, realtors, plumbing, radio & TV sales and service, electrical goods and services, florists, sporting goods, small engine repairs, a travel agent, lawyers, machinery dealers, painting and decorating services, tire sales and services, video rentals, bulk oil and fuel sales, grain elevators and grain marketing, financial institutions, funerary services and so on. There is a movie theatre, a library, an arts centre, a liquor board outlet and a veterinary clinic. Service clubs include the Lions & Lioness, the Arts Council, the Elks & Royal Purple, the Legion and Fish & Game. There are five churches with active congregations: St Paul's Lutheran, Christ Lutheran, St. Joseph's Catholic, Langenburg Evangelical Fellowship,[9] and the United Church of Canada.[10]

Demographics[edit]

N/A = Data Not Available

See also Culture of Saskatchewan

Sites of interest[edit]

Carlton Trail Regional Park and Golf Course is located 18 km south of Langenburg on No. 8 Highway.

Education[edit]

Langenburg has two education centres for students: Hoffman Elementary School and Langenburg High School.

Sports teams[edit]

The Langenburg Warriors play in the Triangle Hockey League and finished second during the 2009-2010 regular season. During the playoffs, the Warriors lost to the third place Bredenbury Cougars in the semi-finals. In 2011 the Langenburg Warriors finished third but went on to defeat the Cougars in a sweep, avenging the previous season's disappointing finish.

Langenburg also has a very good minor ball program that fields teams from T-ball to Midget age divisions. Langenburg High School is home to the Langenburg Eagles competing against teams in and around the province in sports such as: Volleyball, Basketball, Track and Field, Badminton, Curling, and Golf.

Notable natives[edit]

Langenburg is the home town of Kelly Buchberger, formerly of the National Hockey League and currently an assistant coach with the Edmonton Oilers. It is also the hometown of David Milgaard, known for being wrongly convicted for murder in Saskatoon and improsioned for 23 years.

Geography[edit]

  • Lat (DMS) 50° 50' 00" N
  • Long (DMS) 101° 42' 00" W
  • Dominion Land Survey Sections 27 and 34, Township 21, Range 31 west of the 1st Meridian
  • Time zone (CST) UTC−6


This information for the above chart can be found on the listing given at Canadian Geographical names or the Canadian Archives Post Office and Post Master website see external links below for helpful URLs

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Langenburg
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 7
(45)
10
(50)
22
(72)
28
(82)
34
(93)
37
(99)
37.8
(100)
37.8
(100)
32
(90)
32
(90)
22.2
(72)
11.5
(52.7)
37.8
(100)
Average high °C (°F) −12.9
(8.8)
−9.1
(15.6)
−1.9
(28.6)
8.4
(47.1)
17.5
(63.5)
22
(72)
24
(75)
23.6
(74.5)
17.1
(62.8)
10
(50)
−2.7
(27.1)
−10.3
(13.5)
7.2
(45)
Daily mean °C (°F) −18
(0)
−14.3
(6.3)
−7
(19)
2.7
(36.9)
10.7
(51.3)
15.7
(60.3)
17.6
(63.7)
16.7
(62.1)
10.7
(51.3)
4.1
(39.4)
−7
(19)
−14.8
(5.4)
1.4
(34.5)
Average low °C (°F) −23
(−9)
−19.4
(−2.9)
−12.1
(10.2)
−2.9
(26.8)
3.9
(39)
9.4
(48.9)
11.1
(52)
9.7
(49.5)
4.2
(39.6)
−1.9
(28.6)
−11.2
(11.8)
−19.3
(−2.7)
−4.3
(24.3)
Record low °C (°F) −45.6
(−50.1)
−43.9
(−47)
−41.7
(−43.1)
−28.3
(−18.9)
−8.9
(16)
−2.8
(27)
0
(32)
−1.1
(30)
−10
(14)
−23
(−9)
−38
(−36)
−42.5
(−44.5)
−45.6
(−50.1)
Precipitation mm (inches) 23.4
(0.921)
16.6
(0.654)
25.4
(1)
22.7
(0.894)
48.1
(1.894)
76.7
(3.02)
72.1
(2.839)
65.6
(2.583)
48.8
(1.921)
24.9
(0.98)
20.4
(0.803)
20.8
(0.819)
465.4
(18.323)
Source: Environment Canada[12]

Location[edit]


[13]

Miscellaneous topics and similar lists[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ National Archives, Archivia Net, Post Offices and Postmasters 
  2. ^ Government of Saskatchewan, MRD Home, Municipal Directory System [dead link]
  3. ^ Canadian Textiles Institute. (2005), CTI Determine your provincial constituency 
  4. ^ Commissioner of Canada Elections, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada (2005), Elections Canada On-line 
  5. ^ Adams, Irene and Johnson, Gilbert. Walk Back Through Time. p. 24; Saskatoon: Modern Press, 1980.
  6. ^ Johnson, G.,A History of Langenburg School District No. 105, 1887-1962
  7. ^ Walk Back Through Time, op.cit. p.25
  8. ^ Statistics Canada Community Profiles
  9. ^ Langenburg Evangelical Fellowship
  10. ^ Adamson, Julia (16 Feb 2013). "Saskatchewan Roman Catholic Churches ~ Online Parish Registers ~ History > Langenburg". Saskatchewan Gen Web. Ancestry.com. Retrieved 2013-02-21. 
  11. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2009-02-24. 
  12. ^ Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 4 August 2010
  13. ^ Becquet's Custom Programming (August 17, 2005), Saskatchewan City & Town Maps - Directory (– Scholar search) [dead link]

Published works[edit]

  • Adams, Irene and Johnson, Gilbert. Walk Back Through Time. 1980. Saskatoon: Modern Press, 1980.
  • Adams, Irene, ed. One Hundred Years in the Fellowship of the Holy Spirit. 1989. Langenburg: St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1989.
  • Schaab, Mary, ed. Our Heritage. 1997. Langenburg: The Langenburg and District Book Committee, 1997.


References[edit]

see Notes.


External links[edit]

See also[edit]