Language Creation Society

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The Language Creation Society
Industry Entertainment
Founded 2007
Founders Sai
Headquarters Garden Grove, California, United States
Area served Worldwide
Key people Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets (President)
George Corley (Vice President)
Donald Boozer (Librarian/Secretary)
Sylvia Sotomayor (Treasurer)
Products Motion Picture, Television
Website Conlang.org

The Language Creation Society (LCS) is a non-profit organization formed to promote constructed languages (conlangs), support makers of constructed languages (conlangers), and inform the general public about conlangs and the conlanger community. The LCS also acts as an intermediary for creative people seeking conlangs for use in creative works (in any media) and for conlangers seeking professional work.

Mission[edit]

The LCS seeks "to promote conlangs and conlanging through offering platforms for conlangers to publish high-quality work of interest to the community, raising awareness about conlanging amongst the general public, organizing work for professional conlangers and people in the entertainment industry interested in adding more depth to their alternative worlds, and providing a central place for reliable contacts and information to those seeking to learn more."[1]

Professional services[edit]

A client's request describing their needs and the type of conlang(s) they want is sent to a list of conlangers seeking work; the proposals submitted by the conlangers are then peer-reviewed in a double-blind process by a panel of volunteers who are not seeking such work, or at least not candidates for that particular job. The proposals thought best by the peer reviewers are then forwarded to the client, who selects one to be more fully developed by its creator.[2] To date, the LCS has been hired by HBO, and contracted David J. Peterson to create the Dothraki language for its series Game of Thrones, based on George R.R. Martin's series of epic fantasy novels A Song of Ice and Fire.[3] Olivier Simon was selected by LCS to create "Leosprache" for the German short-film Der Liebe Leo.[4]

Community support[edit]

Most online conlanger fora and communities predate the LCS and are independent of it (e.g. the CONLANG mailing list and Zompist Bulletin Board). The LCS provides web hosting for a number of newer community-oriented projects, including the Conlang Atlas of Language Structures, a mirror of the CONLANG mailing list archives, a conlang blog aggregator, and archive hosting of deceased conlangers' websites, in addition to hosting for individual members' conlang-oriented homepages.[5]

The LCS started a podcast in February 2009;[6] as of October 2010, an academic journal is in the works as well.[7]

The LCS also holds a Language Creation Conference roughly every other year; conferences so far were held in 2006 (Berkeley, California), 2007 (Berkeley, California), 2009 (Providence, Rhode Island), and 2011 (Groningen, the Netherlands).[8]

LCS Members[edit]

Several of the LCS members and associates have been hired as linguistic consultants. Bill Welden was a consultant for the Lord of the Rings trilogy for Elvish.[9] Many have degrees in linguistics, and some are currently working on projects that are covered by non-disclosure agreements.[3] David J. Peterson was hired as the linguistic consultant for the TV series Game of Thrones to develop the Dothraki language.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Brief Introduction to Conlanging for Journalists". Language Creation Society. 
  2. ^ "An interview with David J. Peterson and Sai Emrys about Dothraki and the Language Creation Society". Usona Esperantisto, 2010:5. 
  3. ^ a b Ellen B. Wright (April 22, 2010). "Creating Dothraki: An Interview with David J. Peterson and Sai Emrys". Tor.com. 
  4. ^ "Philip Newton, introduction to showing of ''Der Liebe Leo'' at LCC4". Ustream.tv. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
  5. ^ "LCS Web Hosting". Conlang.org. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
  6. ^ "Language Creation Society» Blog Archive » Welcome to the Language Creation Society blog/podcast". Podcast.conlang.org. 2009-02-10. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
  7. ^ fiatlingua.org
  8. ^ "Language Creation Conference homepage". LCC. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
  9. ^ "Defenders of The Ring up in arms at myth in the making". Times Higher Education. 2001-08-03. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
  10. ^ Poniewozik, James (2010-04-12). "Today in Fictional-Language News: HBO Speaks Dothraki - Tuned In - TIME.com". Tunedin.blogs.time.com. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 

External links[edit]