Languages in censuses

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Many countries and national censuses currently enumerate or have previously enumerated their populations by languages, native language, home language, level of knowing language or a combination of these characteristics.

Contents

Abkhazia[edit]

Afghanistan[edit]

Albania[edit]

Algeria[edit]

Andorra[edit]

Angola[edit]

Argentina[edit]

Armenia[edit]

Australia[edit]

Austria[edit]

Azerbaijan[edit]

Bahamas[edit]

Bahrain[edit]

Bangladesh[edit]

Barbados[edit]

Belarus[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Further information: Language legislation in Belgium

In the past, Belgium held a census each ten years, including a language census (nl/fr). Since 1932, the results of this census defined to which official language a municipality belonged (Dutch, French or German). However, this caused a lot of conflicts along the language border, in Brussels and its periphery (due to the Francization of Brussels). The territory of Belgium was consequently divided into four definitive official language areas[1] and the language census was abolished, effective 1 September 1963. No national language censuses have been held since then.

Belize[edit]

Benin[edit]

Bermuda[edit]

Bhutan[edit]

Bolivia[edit]

According to the last census in 2012 [2]

Language People
Spanish 6,097,122
Quechua 2,124,040
Aymara 1,462,286
Foreign 241,417
Guarani 57,218
Another Native 43,953
No talking 14,960

Bosnia and Herzegovina[edit]

Botswana[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Brunei[edit]

>

Bulgaria[edit]

Burkina Faso[edit]

Burma[edit]

Burundi[edit]

Cambodia[edit]

Cameroon[edit]

Canada[edit]

Cape Verde[edit]

Central African Republic[edit]

Chad[edit]

Chile[edit]

China[edit]

Colombia[edit]

Democratic Republic of Congo[edit]

Republic of Congo[edit]

Costa Rica[edit]

Croatia[edit]

Cyprus[edit]

Czech Republic[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Djibouti[edit]

Dominica[edit]

Dominican Republic[edit]

East Timor[edit]

Ecuador[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Equatorial Guinea[edit]

El Salvador[edit]

Eritrea[edit]

Estonia[edit]

Ethiopia[edit]

Fiji[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Gabon[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Germany[edit]

Ghana[edit]

Greece[edit]

Guatemala[edit]

Guinea[edit]

Guinea-Bissau[edit]

Guyana[edit]

Haiti[edit]

Honduras[edit]

Hungary[edit]

Starting from 1880 the Hungarian census system was based on native language (the language spoken at home in the early life of the person and at the time of the survey), vulgar language (the most frequently used language in the family), and other spoken languages.

Iceland[edit]

India[edit]

Indonesia[edit]

Iran[edit]

Iraq[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Questions relating to the ability to speak the Irish Language are included in the census. The figures obtained have been criticised as inflated by cognitive biases, such as response bias or wishful thinking.[citation needed] The 2006 census included an additional question on frequency of speaking Irish.

Israel[edit]

Italy[edit]

Censuses in Italy do not inquire about language.

Ivory Coast[edit]

Jamaica[edit]

Japan[edit]

Kazakhstan[edit]

Kenya[edit]

Kosovo[edit]

Kuwait[edit]

Kyrgyzstan[edit]

Laos[edit]

Latvia[edit]

Lesotho[edit]

Liberia[edit]

Libya[edit]

Liechtenstein[edit]

Lithuania[edit]

Luxembourg[edit]

Macedonia[edit]

As of the last national census in 2002, of the republic's 2,022,547 people, 67% speak Macedonian as their mother tongue. The next most common mother tongue is Albanian with 25% of the population. Other minority languages include Turkish (3.6%), Romani (1.9%), and the Serbo-croatian languages (1.6%).[3]

Madagascar[edit]

Malawi[edit]

Malaysia[edit]

Mali[edit]

Mauritania[edit]

Mauritius[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Moldova[edit]

Monaco[edit]

Mongolia[edit]

Montenegro[edit]

Morocco[edit]

Mozambique[edit]

Nagorno Karabakh[edit]

Namibia[edit]

Nauru[edit]

Nepal[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Nicaragua[edit]

Niger[edit]

Nigeria[edit]

North Korea[edit]

Norway[edit]

In the Norwegian census of 1970, in limited areas in Northern Norway, people were identified by ethnicity and language. Such information has not been included in any census since then.[4]

Oman[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

Palau[edit]

Palestine[edit]

Panama[edit]

Papua New Guinea[edit]

Paraguay[edit]

Peru[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Poland[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Puerto Rico[edit]

Qatar[edit]

Romania[edit]

Russia/Soviet Union[edit]

Rwanda[edit]

San Marino[edit]

Sao Tome and Principe[edit]

Saudi Arabia[edit]

Senegal[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Seychelles[edit]

Sierra Leone[edit]

Singapore[edit]

Slovakia[edit]

Slovenia[edit]

Somalia[edit]

South Africa[edit]

Thirteen options are provided in response to the question "Which two languages does (name) speak most often in this household?", namely the eleven official languages, sign language and "Other".[5]

South Korea[edit]

Spain[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

Sudan[edit]

Suriname[edit]

Swaziland[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

Languages of Switzerland, red German, blue French, green Italian, yellow Romansh

From 1850 until 2000, Switzerland had a census every 10 years. Beginning in 2010, they switched to a yearly system which used a combination of municipal citizen records and a limited number of surveys.[6] Data on the main language spoken by citizens and non-citizen residents has been collected since at least 1970. Of the four official languages, German is the most commonly spoken, with 64.94% of the total population speaking it in 1970 and 63.67% in 2000. French was spoken by 18.09% in 1970 and 20.38% in 2000, while Italian was 11.86% in 1970 and 6.46% in 2000. The fourth national language, Romansh was spoken by just 0.8% in 1970 and 0.48% in 2000. In the 2000 census, English (1.01%), Spanish (1.06%), Portuguese (1.23%), Serbian and Croatian (1.42%) and Albanian (1.30%) were all spoken by significantly more residents than Romansh.[7]

Selected languages from the 1970 to 2000 census are given in the following table:[7]

Census German French Italian Romansh English Dutch Spanish Slavic
(Except
Czech and
Slovak)
Czech and
Slovak
1970 4,071,289 1,134,010 743,760 50,339 32,509 11,935 123,708 30,429 13,028
1980 4,140,901 1,172,502 622,226 51,128 38,494 13,228 118,169 65,779 14,570
1990 4,374,694 1,321,695 524,116 39,632 60,786 11,895 116,818 119,541 8,552
2000 4,640,359 1,485,056 470,961 35,095 73,425 11,840 77,506 120,853 7,462

Syria[edit]

Tajikistan[edit]

Tanzania[edit]

Thailand[edit]

Togo[edit]

Transnistria[edit]

Tunisia[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Turkmenistan[edit]

People in Turkmenistan (when it was still a part of the Russian Empire) were enumerated by native tongue in the 1897 Russian Empire Census.[citation needed] In addition to the Soviet Union enumerating people by ethnicity for its entire existence,[citation needed] Turkmenistan also enumerated people by ethnicity in its only post-Soviet census in 1995.[8]

Uganda[edit]

Ukraine[edit]

Ethnolinguistic composition of Ukraine.

People in Ukraine (when it was still a part of the Russian Empire) were enumerated by native tongue in the 1897 Russian Empire Census.[citation needed] In addition to the Soviet Union enumerating people by ethnicity for its entire existence,[citation needed] Ukraine also enumerated people by ethnicity in its only post-Soviet census in 2001.[9]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

Uruguay[edit]

Uzbekistan[edit]

People in Uzbekistan (when it was still a part of the Russian Empire) were enumerated by native tongue in the 1897 Russian Empire Census.[citation needed] The Soviet Union (to which Uzbekistan also belonged) enumerated people by ethnicity for its entire existence.[citation needed] Uzbekistan has not conducted any censuses at all since 1989.[10]

Vatican City[edit]

Vatican City enumerated people by ethnicity in 1948.[citation needed]

Venezuela[edit]

Vietnam[edit]

Yemen[edit]

Ethnoreligious composition of Yemen in 2002.

Yemen enumerated its population by ethnicity in 1994.[citation needed] The British Colony of Aden (which is within Yemen's current borders) enumerated its population by ethnicity in 1946 and 1955.[citation needed]

Zambia[edit]

Zimbabwe[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]