Lansing State Journal

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Lansing State Journal
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Gannett Company
Publisher Brian Priester
Founded April 28, 1855
Headquarters 120 E. Lenawee St.
Lansing, MI 48919
 United States
Circulation 40,330 Weekday
43,885 Saturday
65,904 Sunday[1]
Website lsj.com

The Lansing State Journal is a daily newspaper published in Lansing, Michigan owned by Gannett.

Overview[edit]

The Lansing State Journal is the sole daily newspaper published in metropolitan Lansing. The newspaper had an average Monday through Friday readership of 41,330, a Saturday readership of 43,885, and a Sunday Readership of 65,904 from October 2011 to March 2012. It had an average Monday through Saturday readership of 47,716, and a Sunday readership of 66,518 from November 2010 to April 2011.[1]

History[edit]

The paper was started as the Lansing Republican on April 28, 1855, to advance the causes of the newly founded Republican Party in Michigan.[2] Founder and publisher Henry Barnes completed only two issues of the weekly abolitionist publication before selling it and returning to Detroit.

According to the Pioneer History of Ingham County, "In a few weeks, Barnes sold his interests to Herman E. Haskill. Shortly after Haskill made this purchase he met with a great disappointment. He was not appointed State Printer. Two men, Fitch and Hosmer, got the appointment, and Haskill sold his interests to them, and they published the paper in connection with the State printing. In 1857 Fitch sold his interests to John A. Kerr, and the firm’s name was changed to Kerr & Hosmer. I can remember the two men and the old red building on West Michigan Avenue where the State printing and binding was done, and this paper was published. It had a long sign on the roof that informed the passerby that it was the State Bindery and Republican Office."

Over the next 50 years, the paper saw many name changes and many different owners, finally merging with the rival Lansing Journal forming The State Journal in January 1911. Gannett bought the paper in 1971, and it became the Lansing State Journal on August 25, 1980. On April 15, 1985, it became a morning publication, rather than an afternoon one.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Audit Bureau of Circulations, Circulation averages for the six months ended: 3/31/2012". Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  2. ^ Justin L. Kestenbaum (1981) Out of a Wilderness, An Illustrated History of Greater Lansing, Woodland Hills, CA: Windsor Publications, p.10-11.

External links[edit]

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