Lapstone, New South Wales

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Lapstone
New South Wales
(1)View east from south Lapstone-1.jpg
View east from south Lapstone
Coordinates 33°46′26″S 150°38′13″E / 33.774°S 150.637°E / -33.774; 150.637Coordinates: 33°46′26″S 150°38′13″E / 33.774°S 150.637°E / -33.774; 150.637
Population 854 (2006 Census)[1]
Postcode(s) 2773
Location 60 km (37 mi) from Sydney CBD
LGA(s) City of Blue Mountains
Federal Division(s) Division of Lindsay
Localities around Lapstone:
Glenbrook Glenbrook Leonay
Glenbrook Lapstone Leonay
Megalong Valley Megalong Valley Leonay

Lapstone is a small village on the eastern escarpment of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales, Australia. Lapstone is located 62 kilometres west of Sydney in the local government area of the City of Blue Mountains and is part of the federal electorate of Macquarie.[2] The village consists mostly of stand-alone housing and has a few public facilities. At the 2006 census, Lapstone had a population of 854 people.[1] Lapstone was originally bought and developed by Mr Arthur J Hand, an Alderman of the Blue Mountains City Council.

History[edit]

The Lapstone Zig Zag line (or "little" zig zag) opened near Glenbrook in 1867. The ascent of Lapstone Hill on a gradient of 1 in 30-33, was built up the side of the range with comparatively light earthwork, includes the substantial seven-span sandstone Knapsack Viaduct. The viaduct was later widened to carry the old Great Western Highway, when the deviation around the Lapstone Zig Zag was built. The zig zag is now part of a walking trail on the old railway/highway alignment, including a memorial to John Whitton, the engineer in charge of the construction of the Blue Mountains line and many other early railways.[3] One feature of this line was the Lucasville platform, which is now abandoned. Remains of it can still be seen.

A new route was created in 1892 to avoid the Zig Zag. After crossing the viaduct, the new line curved around to the west and went through a new tunnel that emerged further west near the Great Western Highway. The tunnel can still be seen from neighbouring bush tracks.[4]

In 1913, the present route was constructed, going along the escarpment of Glenbrook Gorge and through a new tunnel at the spot known as The Bluff. One of the features of this project was the construction of a temporary railway line that crossed Darks Common south of Explorers Road. The rail line has been removed but the cutting can still be seen, as well as the remains of the winding house base near the escarpment.[5]

It has been suggested that Lapstone was named by early explorers who found smooth stones in the area which reminded them of the lapstones used by cobblers.[6]

Public transport[edit]

Lapstone railway station is on the Blue Mountains Line of the NSW TrainLink intercity network. Lapstone can be accessed by road from the Great Western Highway/M4 Motorway by exiting at Governors Drive and Explorers Road from Glenbrook.

Lapstone Hotel[edit]

The original Lapstone Hotel was designed and constructed in early 1930s by Herwald Gordon Kirkpatrick. Mr Kirkpatrick was a notable Sydney Architect who worked with his father, John Kirkpatrick, who in the late 1800s until his death in 1923, was regarded as one of Sydney's leading architects. He was responsible for the design and construction of many landmark buildings in Sydney. Following the death of Herwald in 1951, the Lapstone Hotel was taken over by the RAAF Base Glenbrook, who have continuously used the property as their Officer's Mess.

The new Lapstone Hotel was built in 1980 on the Great Western Highway, Blaxland. It was renovated in 2007 after being purchased by the Lewis Group of Hotels.[7]

Education[edit]

  • Lapstone Public School
  • Lapstone Pre-school

Sport and recreation[edit]

Lapstone Oval features a Rugby union field, an artificial cricket pitch (which is taken out during the winter months), sixteen netball courts (7 are grass and 9 are asphalt) and play area for young children.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Lapstone (State Suburb)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 25 October 2009. 
  2. ^ http://www.aec.gov.au/Electorates/Redistributions/2009/nsw/final-report/files/macquarie.pdf
  3. ^ "Bridges around the Penrith Area". Penrith City Council. 4 April 2006. Retrieved 5 April 2012. 
  4. ^ How to See the Blue Mountains, Jim Smith (Second Back Row Press) 1986, p.74
  5. ^ How to See the Blue Mountains, pp.75
  6. ^ http://www.bluemts.com.au/tourist/towns/Lapstone.asp More information about Lapstone
  7. ^ Lapstone Hotel Website

External links[edit]